Jean-Baptiste Vuillaume

(redirected from Jean Baptiste Vuillaume)

Vuillaume, Jean-Baptiste

 

Born Oct. 7, 1798, in Mirecourt; died Mar. 19, 1875, in Paris. French master craftsman of bowed instruments.

In 1828, Vuillaume opened his own workshop in Paris. Beginning in 1835, he worked on imitations of old Italian instruments (for the most part, Stradivari and Guarnieri models). From 1865 he made violins, violas, and cellos, based on a model which he himself had created. Vuillaume affirmed a new, uniquely national type of sound for bowed instruments—bright and intense but insufficiently flexible. He invented original designs for the double bass (the so-called octobasse, 1849), the viola (the so-called alto viola, 1855), and a special sourdine pedale for the piano (1867). Vuillaume’s best instruments are used in concerts to the present day.

References in periodicals archive ?
He currently plays on a Jean Baptiste Vuillaume violin on loan from Frau Angela Schmeink.
Owned for 30 years by Lady Anne Blunt, granddaughter of the famous English poet Lord Byron, the violin has also belonged to the famed Parisian dealer Jean Baptiste Vuillaume, the collectors Richard Bennett, the Baron Knoop and Sam Bloomfield, and The Nippon Music Foundation.