Jean Hyppolite

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Hyppolite, Jean


Born Jan. 8, 1907, in Jonzac; died Oct. 27, 1968, in Paris. French idealist philosopher, influenced by German neo-Hegelianism. Professor of philosophy at the Sor-bonne from 1947 to 1955, director of the Ecole Normale Superi-eure from 1955 to 1963, professor at the College de France from 1963.

Hyppolite translated Hegel’s Phenomenology of Mind into French in 1939 and wrote several works on his philosophy, which he interpreted from a position close to that of existentialism. In his articles on the early works of Marx, Hyppolite developed the idea that the Marxist economic doctrine was based not so much on an analysis of the facts as on philosophical assumptions and moral imperatives going back to Hegel. French Marxists have subjected Hyppolite’s anti-Marxist views to criticism.


Genèse et structure de la phénoménologie de l’esprit. Paris, 1947.
Introduction a la philosophic de I’histoire de Hegel. Paris, 1948.
Logique et existence. Paris, 1953.
Etudes sur Marx et Hegel. Paris, 1955.


Gretskii, M. N. “Kritika neogegel’ianstva marksistami Frantsii.” In Voprosy filosofii, 1963, no. 8.


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Instead, he emphasizes the influence of Jean Hyppolite, the translator and commentator of Hegel's Phenomenology, and a teacher at the Ecole Normale Superieure and other strategic high learning institutions.
The first essay sets the stage insofar as the work of Jean Hyppolite is seen as foundational for Derrida and Foucault.
The claim that Kant does not account for concrete experience relies heavily on citations from Jean Hyppolite and Jean-Francois Lyotard (17).