Jean de Meun


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Meun, Jean de:

see Jean de MeunJean de Meun
, d. 1305, French poet, also known as Jean Chopinel (or Clopinel) of Meung-sur-Loire. He wrote the second part of the Roman de la Rose and made translations from Latin, including the letters of Abelard to Heloise.
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Jean de Meun

(zhäN də möN), d. 1305, French poet, also known as Jean Chopinel (or Clopinel) of Meung-sur-Loire. He wrote the second part of the Roman de la RoseRoman de la Rose, Le
, French poem of 22,000 lines in eight-syllable couplets. It is in two parts. The first (4,058 lines) was written (c.1237) by Guillaume de Lorris and was left unfinished. It is an elaborate allegory on the psychology of love, often subtle and charming.
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 and made translations from Latin, including the letters of Abelard to Heloise. Called by some the Voltaire of the Middle Ages, Jean de Meun was a man of encyclopedic knowledge, a fearless thinker, and a satirical writer.
References in periodicals archive ?
As their Psalter and breviary the amorous poets of the temple read Ovid, Petrarch, Chartier, Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun.
Language and the Declining World in Chaucer, Dante and Jean de Meun.
The trick that Jean de Meun plays occurs in the mid-point of the conjoined text: in a speech by Amor, the Lover, Amant, is suddenly named as Guillaume de Lorris.
La lecon de Jean de Meun est toutefois seulement partiellement retenue.
The letters of Abelard and Heloise have attracted an audience ever since the thirteenth century, when Jean de Meun, the author of The Romance of the Rose, brought them to the attention of his readers by quoting a particularly provocative line by Heloise.
Hutcheson's "The Sodomitic Moor: Queerness in the Narrative of Reconquista" and Susan Schiaboff's "Sodomy's Mark: Alan of Lille, Jean de Meun, and the Medieval Theory of Authorship" contribute to our understanding of their respective subjects.
32) Jean de Meun confirmed the advice to avoid an empty stomach and advised a lady "to keep her mouth away from other people's noses.
examines Christine de Pisan's campaign against Jean de Meun and the antifeminist masters of the University of Paris, and then sketches brief portraits of Catherine of Siena and Joan of Arc as seen by their contemporaries.
In an effort to understand the critical history of translation in the Middle Ages, Copeland's study features close readings of German, French, and English translations of Latin texts, including works by Jean de Meun, Chaucer, and Gower
Encyclopedic Writing of the Scholastic Age: Vincent of Beauvais, Ramon Llull, Jean de Meun.
III) e piu in generale tutti quei filosofi-teologi del XII secolo che dell'eros in quanto "amore [salvifico] che viene alla carne, da altro" (47) si fecero via via neoplatonici cantori; per approdare all'ormai scialba personificazione "di tutti i nomi che dicevano la trascendenza dell'uomo a se stesso" (88), cioe a quella Raison a carattere scolastico-allegorico che Jean de Meun pone dinanzi al suo Amante in alternativa a Nature, e di cui l'Amante-Durante del Fiore intravede la consustanzialita sapienziale con Amore (cap.
While the title might suggest a treatment of the Roman de la Rose within a tradition of vernacular commentary on other texts, and while that theme is indeed treated intermittently, the major thrusts of the book divide between the Rose, and very specifically that part of it written by Jean de Meun, as an object of commentary in the later Middle Ages and an assessment of the steadily growing late-medieval corpus of commentary in the vernacular in France, Italy, Iberia, and England.