Jeffersonian

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Jeffersonian

Neoclassical architecture based on the architecture of Thomas Jefferson, as expressed in the buildings on the campus of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taylor then goes through chapter and verse of the transgressions against Jeffersonianism of practically all of Reagan's top appointees.
A close reading of the "Woody Sez" columns in the People's Daily World provides ample evidence that the California years of the late 1930s were a crucial period in which Guthrie investigated the living conditions of the dust bowl refugees and formulated a radical hybrid political ideology which incorporated elements of Christian socialism, social banditry, populism, Jeffersonianism, collectivism, "commonism," and the ideology of the Communist Party.
If a new upsurge in Jeffersonianism were to occur, it would have to originate outside the major political parties and the mainstream media.
There is more than a tinge of utopianism in his assumption that political evolution is a one-way, albeit bumpy, progression toward Jeffersonianism.
Taylor's twelve tenets of Jeffersonianism lead him to characterize Jefferson as both populist and libertarian--a somewhat atypical portrait.
The book's narrative is ordered around three "presidential paradigms": Hamiltonianism, Jeffersonianism, and Progressivism (p.
There is already an enormous and contentious literature on a score of related topics, ranging from Bacon's rebellion in 1676 to the Populist revolt of the 1880s and '90s, from Jeffersonianism to the Ku Klux Klan, from nineteenth-century federal land policies to the growth of agribusiness, that she addresses.
For example, we might see elements of populism in revolutionary attitudes towards Britain, in Anti-Federalism, Jeffersonianism, Jacksonianism, and certain versions of the antebellum Free Labor Movement.
Consider the fact that new "conservatives" attorney Amos Pinchot, publisher Frank Gannett, publisher Robert McCormick, businessman Robert Wood, socialite Alice Roosevelt Longworth, aviator Charles Lindbergh, and Congressman Hamilton Fish all came out of the Bull Moose-La Follette-Borah tradition of liberal Jeffersonianism within the party.
Convinced that a few self-interested leaders were misleading Massachusetts' voters, he hoped that Philip Freneau's newspaper, the Philadelphia National Gazette, begun in October 1791 to compete with John Fenno's Federalist Gazette of the United States, would convert the people to Jeffersonianism and defeat congressman Fisher Ames' reelection bid.
Yet 1800 was a triumph for Jeffersonianism so decisive that it sounded the Federalist Party's death knell and set the course for American public policy far into the 19th century.
126, in which Van Buren's attempts to have Jackson tie himself to the political principles of Jeffersonianism in the 1828 election are discussed.