Jephthah


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Jephthah

(jĕf`thə), in the Book of Judges, a Hebrew raider, son of Gilead and a judge of Israel. He vowed if victorious over the Ammonites to sacrifice the first of his household to meet him on his return. His daughter was the price of this vow. He also masterminded a slaughter of neighboring Ephraimites. Jephthah is also mentioned in the New Testament book of Hebrews.

Jephthah

routed the Ammonites to save Israelites. [O.T.: Judges 11:32]

Jephthah

Old Testament a judge of Israel, who sacrificed his daughter in fulfilment of a vow (Judges 11:12--40)
References in periodicals archive ?
The laws attributed to Moses in the generations between Abraham and Jephthah codified emphatically that Israel's God does not abide child sacrifice, or indeed any taking of a human life: "Thou shaft not kill.
Pentecostal minister Jephthah Burnett has died aged 85
If you call me Jephthah, my lord, I have a daughter that I love passing well.
Nicholas Cranfield's essay on artistic representations of the chilling story of Jephthah and his daughter from Judges is the only study from a nonliterary disciplinary perspective (for which a single color plate is included, the only image in the book).
The mixture of greys, dark reds and orange of the stone pillars add to the sense of airy silence and composure, not even broken by the carved figures on the throne--of Abraham about to sacrifice Isaac, Jephthah sacrificing his daughter (Fig.
They omitted characters who are hopelessly subservient, such as the daughter of Jephthah who is sacrificed by her father due to a thoughtless religious vow.
German-born Charles Zeuner (1795-1857) wrote his oratorio Feast of Tabernacles in Boston, and John Hewitt (1801-1890) produced an oratorio Jephthah.
The last image depicts Jephthah mourning the loss of his daughter at his own hand.
To support this notion Judges 11:34 serves as an illustration: when Jephthah went back home to Mizpah, his daughter came out to meet him, dancing and playing the tambourine.
Carissimi set the Old Testament tragedy of Jephthah to a vividly imagined score.
Analysis of two Nazarite rituals performed by young female virgins demonstrates how the merging of precolonial Nguni fertility rites for young girls with the biblical story of Jephthah harnesses physical fertility for the physical and moral reproduction of the Nazarite order.
HAMLET: O Jephthah, judge of Israel, what a treasure hadst thou