Jephthah


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Jephthah

(jĕf`thə), in the Book of Judges, a Hebrew raider, son of Gilead and a judge of Israel. He vowed if victorious over the Ammonites to sacrifice the first of his household to meet him on his return. His daughter was the price of this vow. He also masterminded a slaughter of neighboring Ephraimites. Jephthah is also mentioned in the New Testament book of Hebrews.

Jephthah

routed the Ammonites to save Israelites. [O.T.: Judges 11:32]

Jephthah

Old Testament a judge of Israel, who sacrificed his daughter in fulfilment of a vow (Judges 11:12--40)
References in periodicals archive ?
The laws attributed to Moses in the generations between Abraham and Jephthah codified emphatically that Israel's God does not abide child sacrifice, or indeed any taking of a human life: "Thou shaft not kill.
Hamlet's meditation on Jephthah certainly reflects Shakespeare's recurring concern with unusually close father-daughter relationships, with perhaps incestuous potential, (63) and also contributes to Hamlet's quasi-Oedipal, ongoing critique of Polonius.
Pentecostal minister Jephthah Burnett has died aged 85
40) This allusion to the biblical story of Jephthah was placed on the American battle standards.
O Jephthah, judge of Israel, what a treasure hadst thou
The book, dedicated to the memory of Ephraim's own father, really gets into its stride when it begins talking about the relationships of female Jewish characters to their fathers, beginning with adaptations of the biblical story of Jephthah and his daughter, whom in Judges 11 he is forced to sacrifice, and moving on to Marlowe's Abigail and Shakespeare's Jessica.
I would also nominate Jephthah, Samson, Saul, Ahab, Naomi, and Esther as characters with persuasive power.
As with nationalisms since that of the Hebrew Bible--and the opening allusion to Jephthah gives the first Idyll a Hebrew cast in addition to its prevailing Saxon one--the nation Arthur intends to inaugurate has a pronounced racial dimension.
Of such kind of sin is that [account of] Jephthah, who, on account of his oath, sacrificed his very own daughter (Judges [11:30-40]).
Nicholas Cranfield's essay on artistic representations of the chilling story of Jephthah and his daughter from Judges is the only study from a nonliterary disciplinary perspective (for which a single color plate is included, the only image in the book).
The mixture of greys, dark reds and orange of the stone pillars add to the sense of airy silence and composure, not even broken by the carved figures on the throne--of Abraham about to sacrifice Isaac, Jephthah sacrificing his daughter (Fig.
They omitted characters who are hopelessly subservient, such as the daughter of Jephthah who is sacrificed by her father due to a thoughtless religious vow.