Jerusalem Delivered


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Jerusalem Delivered

Tasso’s celebrated romantic epic written during Renaissance. [Ital. Lit.: Jerusalem Delivered]
See: Epic
References in periodicals archive ?
It was drawn from Tasso's epic poem Jerusalem Delivered, in which a fatal love story is set against the Muslim-versus-Christian background of the First Crusade.
In the sixteenth canto of Torquato Tasso's Jerusalem Delivered, the Christian paladin Rinaldo prepares to abandon the pagan sorceress Armida and her amorous enchantments in order to return to his martial and religious duties.
Yet Erminia and Armida converge near the end of Jerusalem Delivered as not only enchantresses but also pagan captive women.
In its initial association of the sorceress Armida with artful deception and deceptive art, Jerusalem Delivered follows in a distinguished line of Italian epics.
Such uneasiness toward an allegory that defends and perpetuates what is inappropriate and ugly may help to explain one of the most remarkable differences between Jerusalem Delivered and the Italian epics it imitates.
24-25) and from which Tasso excised many of the marvelous and amorous episodes found in Jerusalem Delivered -- makes no suggestion that the sorceress is ugly without her magic.
By canto 4 of Jerusalem Delivered it already seems tainted:
In her knowledge of healing "carmi," Jane Tylus has suggested, Erminia acts a double for Tasso, who in the third stanza of Jerusalem Delivered imagines his poem as a life-giving medicine (105-06).
At the ballot box in January, the Palestinians of the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem delivered a resounding "yes" vote in favour of the peace process.
Based upon Torquato Tasso's epic Jerusalem Delivered (1581), an account of the capture of the city during the First Crusade, Gluck's opera centres around the wicked sorceress Armide, the Princess of Damascus, and her downfall at the hands of a handsome knight Renaud.
To do so, however, Teskey must ignore Jerusalem Delivered, though he cites Tasso's allegorical theory.
Tasso's Jerusalem Delivered, Spenser's Faerie Queene, in particular Book One, and the ten-book version of Milton's Paradise Lost are the texts given the most detailed analysis, often with diagrams, forty-six alone for the Faerie Queene

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