Jeseníky

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Jeseníky

 

mountains in Czechoslovakia between the upper reaches of the Odra and Morava rivers; the range comprises the Hrubý Jesenik and Nízký Jesenik. Hrubý Jesenik (Mt. Praděd, 1,492 m) is composed primarily of crystalline schists; the slopes are covered with spruce forests to an altitude of 1,300 m and above that are alpine meadows. Nízký Jesenik (Mt. Slunečná, 800 m) is composed of limestones, schists, and sandstones; it is covered with forests and meadows. In the east, Nízký Jesenik merges with the Oder Mountains. Iron ore and the ores of other metals are mined there. The region is noted for its spas and attracts many tourists.

References in periodicals archive ?
The same features have been indicated in the Eastern Moravia, what is supported by uplifts in the Beskydy and Jeseniky Mts.
1950: Contributions to the knowledge of mammals of Jeseniky Mountains, part 3.
Land use/cover disturbance due to tourism in Jeseniky Mountain, Czech Republic: A remote sensing and GIS based approach.
A high diet overlap between the Alpine chamois and red deer, both considered as intermediate feeders (Hofmann 1989), was also detected by Homolka and Heroldova (2001) in the Jeseniky Mountains (Czech Republic), by Bertolino et al.
Orientation - an information system Jesenicke highway will provide visitors with comprehensive information on groomed cross-country ski trails and selected marked paths (tips for cycling) in Jeseniky.
The week-long camp in the Jeseniky Mountains provided expert coaching for goalies from amateur clubs across Tyneside.
Density and distribution of Red deer and Chamois in subalpine meadow habitats in the Jeseniky mountains (Czech Republic).
In contrast, grasses were dominant in other mountain areas representing 92-95% in Jeseniky Mountains (Homolka 1995, 1996), 80% in Krusne Hory Mountains (Heroldova 1993), 70% in Krkonosie Mountains (Fisser & Lochman 1969) and 50-60% in the Swiss Alps (Suter et al.
A camp in the Jeseniky Mountains in Pav's native Czech Republic will see 12 up-and-coming keepers get expert coaching.
4) could indicate the influence of the Carpathian Arc, what is supported also by uplifts in the Beskydy and the Jeseniky Mts.
The mountain range stretching from the Krkonose to the Jeseniky Mountains (the Sudetes) was already dry land in the Cenozoic and was subjected to intensive erosion and transport of the weathering products.