Jesuit

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Jesuit:

see Jesus, Society ofJesus, Society of,
religious order of the Roman Catholic Church. Its members are called Jesuits. St. Ignatius of Loyola, its founder, named it Compañia de Jesús [Span.,=(military) company of Jesus]; in Latin it is Societas Jesu (abbr. S.J.).
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Jesuit

a member of a Roman Catholic religious order (the Society of Jesus) founded by the Spanish ecclesiastic Saint Ignatius Loyola (1491--1556) in 1534 with the aims of defending the papacy and Catholicism against the Reformation and to undertake missionary work among the heathen
References in periodicals archive ?
It is hard to imagine what would have become of Joyce without his Jesuitical instruction, and Flann O'Brien, who was ever aware of the literary ascendancy of his beloved/hated master, acknowledged the strong influence of Irish Catholicism in Joyce's sense of humour, and indirectly his own, in the well-known article "A Bash in the Tunnel":
It's ironic that Robert, who came from an affluent family of Philadelphia bankers steeped in a Quaker heritage, should have found such a congenial home in universities that were essentially Jesuitical and that he should have been such a passionate advocate for the marginalized.
Yet it is also true, and obviously more important, that jesuitical maneuvering around exactly these rules has apparently become commonplace.
39) In theory, the state's enlightened reforms that focused on economic prosperity and progress would have been better accommodated by the Jesuitical side of Catholic Enlightenment with its optimism regarding human nature and disposition towards moral laxism.
No, they must publicly disown the Jesuitical principle "and subscribe to all doctrines which deny the Pope's authority of deposing kings.
Locke sometimes wrote in a shorthand that approximated a code, employed a sufficiently Jesuitical rhetoric as to be judged "disingenuous" more than once by his admiring biographer, and is known to have experimented with invisible ink.
The last chapter of part 1 effects the transition to part 2, "Erotics," and presents an argument for a historical shift in attitudes toward voluntary flagellation, documented in the Protestant critiques of Jesuitical idolatry or the incarnational assumptions that liken the practice to transubstantiation's real, rather than symbolic, transformations.
The question of which Chinese character best matches Christian terms and ideas was, in the end, less of a Jesuitical dilemma than a Protestant one.
But there are still other ironic allusions in the condensed fictional construction of Machado's main character: Simao Bacamarte is also the laic and anti-clerical scientist, who flares Padre Lopes' Jesuitical intrigues and prefers cold science to cordial Catholicism.
Given that the wording of this article (guaranteeing the equal right to life of the "mother") was itself a Jesuitical compromise between militant antichoice demands and liberal instincts, such a referendum seems singularly unlikely, however passionately Bacik may argue the case.
I would probably just recite it mindlessly; or adopt jesuitical "mental reservations" and silently insert a "not" into the propositions I rejected; or think of myself as speaking a made-up language that attaches quite different meanings to the sounds.
I was brought up to believe that the attitude of the Medieval Church to the rate of interest was inherently absurd, and the subtle discussions aimed at distinguishing the return on money-loans from the return to active investment were merely Jesuitical attempts to find a practical escape from foolish theory.