Jewess


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Jewess

Offensive a Jewish girl or woman
References in periodicals archive ?
Wise's son Leon later claimed that Menken "was not a Jewess, but she most ardently desired to become one.
Her heroines range from Isabel de Carvajal, a Jewess who was imprisoned, tortured and finally executed by the Inquisition, to the Mulatta of Cordoba, a breathtakingly beautiful sorceress, reputed to fly through the air and walk through walls.
Dating back to ancient times, this comprehensive collection includes early pioneers such as Mary the Jewess and features chemists up to present day such as Nobel Laureate, Ada Yonath.
And in the political realm, a trailblazing Jewess, Freeda Marks, served in 1922 as the minority Republican leader of the Arizona State Legislature and cofounded the Phoenix chapter of the National Council of Jewish Women.
25) Turn-of-the-century editorials in The American Jewess emphasized the need to prevent black men's attacks upon "defenseless white women of the South.
The Ukraine's far-right ultra-nationalist political party, Svoboda All-Ukrainian Union, recently received global media attention after one of its officials called Ukrainian-born American film actress Mila Kunis a "dirty Jewess," sparking outrage in Western Europe, Israel and the U.
After she had been practicing for just five weeks, the Birkenhead News, in May 1939, described her as "a dark vivacious Jewess.
She is the most gorgeous Jewess on the planet and she has managed to marry James Bond.
He shed one wife and married another in the process, Eva Cohen, an exceptionally beautiful Alexandrian Jewess.
Among her topics are inclination and obligation in Samuel Richardson's Clarissa; wealth, obligation, and female friendship in the marriage market; Rose, Flora, and the Scottish women of Walter Scott's Waverly and the fair Jewess and the less interesting Rowena in his Ivanhoe; remembering the rival in James Fenimore Cooper's The Pioneers and mourning the secondary heroine in his The Last of the Mohicans; and absence and replacement in Catharine Maria Sedgewick's Hope Leslie.
Set in Tunis in the early 1940s, the film is set against the historical backdrop of the Nazi occupation of the city, setting off a train of events that strains the friendship of two young women preparing for their imminent marriages: a Muslim and a Sephardic Jewess.
Would they force a nun to remove her head covering or a Jewess her head scarf simply to satisfy the politiciansAAE desire?