Jewess


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Jewess

Offensive a Jewish girl or woman
References in periodicals archive ?
Daisy Werthan (Sian Phillips) is an ageing Jewess in a prosperous town in the American South.
Koppel, is, in fact, equal parts writer, dumpster diver extraordinaire, and Jewess.
Brought to life in the Ukrainian artist Nikolai Kornilovich Pimonenko's painting Zhertva fanatizma (Victim of Fanaticism; 1899), this converted Jewess was inspired by an actual female convert in a shtetl (Yiddish: small town) in the Pale of Jewish Settlement in late imperial Russia who converted to marry her Christian lover and was then tormented by her former coreligionists.
His 1833 lithograph, The Jewess of Algiers, was a portrait of one of two sisters he used in his Algerian works.
He said: "Paul Bosse had led this criminal rat snatcher from Braunau through the Paul-Gerhardt-Stift, and when he was asked if he had a wish, he asked if it could be ensured that no great misfortune would come to him in view of his marriage to a Jewess.
But then, in October 1944, Franz tells her: "My little Jewess, we can't go on like this.
Third, and more generally, the figure of the Jewess was viewed in distinctly romantic hues in nineteenth-century European and American culture, and Menken could not have failed to recognize that her public persona might benefit from a dose of the exotic.
Although the seniors enjoyed their moments in front of goal, returnee 'keeper Ben Jewess was rarely called on to make a save while, at the other end, first team shot-stopper Mark Harris singlehandedly kept his regular team-mates at bay.
Loeb, a common aspiring Jewess, to attack Woolf's antisemitism.
These are among the provocative questions posed in deceptively unprovocative prose by Moss's "Two Pictures," whose double apostate heroine realizes that, despite her Jewish parents and Jewish environment, she has never been "a Jewess, in the true sense of the word" (24).
The anti Semitic message was that the former Libyan dictator, Gaddafi was a son of a Libyan Jewess, which was aimed at turning the Libyan public against the idea of the return of Libyan Jews to their country.
Among the most exotic was the Polish Countess Christine Gizycki (nee Skarbek) whose mother was a non-practising Jewess.