Jewish


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Related to Jewish: Jewry, Judaism, holocaust, Juden

Jewish

1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Jews
2. a less common word for Yiddish
References in classic literature ?
The hangman did as he was bid, and was tying the cord firmly, when he was stopped by the voice of the Jewish doctor beseeching him to pause, for he had something very important to say.
On hearing the declaration of the Jewish doctor, the chief of police commanded that he should be led to the gallows, and the Sultan's purveyor go free.
We felt deeply sorry for his death, but fearing lest we should be held responsible, we carried the corpse to the house of the Jewish doctor.
Loosen the Jewish doctor," said he to the hangman, "and string up the tailor instead, since he has made confession of his crime.
The Jewish money-changers have their dens close at hand, and all day long are counting bronze coins and transferring them from one bushel basket to another.
He had one other constant attendant, in the person of a beautiful Jewish girl; who attached herself to him from feelings half religious, half romantic, but whose virtuous and disinterested character appears to have been beyond the censure even of the most censorious.
thou must bear a conscience, though it be a Jewish one.
His handsome aquiline nose and keen dark eyes proclaimed his Jewish origin, of which he was ashamed.
Generous Christian master,' urged the Jewish man, 'it being holiday, I looked for no one.
Perched on the stool with his hat cocked on his head and one of his legs dangling, the youth of Fledgeby hardly contrasted to advantage with the age of the Jewish man as he stood with his bare head bowed, and his eyes (which he only raised in speaking) on the ground.
After the Jewish War of Independence in 1948, the conflict became a war between the Jewish state and external Arab enemies.
Judaism," writes Rabbi Lawrence Kushner in his new book, Jewish Spirituality: A Brief Introduction for Christians (Jewish Lights), "is a tradition that may at times, for Christians, feel strangely familiar.