Jewry

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Jewry

1. 
a. Jews collectively
b. the Jewish religion or culture
2. Archaic (sometimes found in street names in England) a quarter of a town inhabited by Jews
3. Archaic the land of Judaea
References in periodicals archive ?
Exceptionalism consequently exaggerates differences and minimizes similarities between Jewries on both sides of the Atlantic.
Quoting from the work of Deborah Dash Moore, an eminent American Jewish historian at Vassar College, Auerbach asserts that she specifically rejects "the premise that 'American Jews in the last decades of the twentieth century sufficiently resemble other Jewries centuries ago to draw analogies,'" and she warns that such analogies are of "'questionable value'" because they are generally employed in the cause of political polemic.
Likewise, the Jewries of the Mediterranean basin were hardly created out of the crisis of the year 70.
German and Polish Jewries, each in its own idiom and context, invented the non-Jewish Jew and the secular Jew.
Ultimately, the creation of an Anglo-American Jewish civilization in an English key has significant ramifications for understanding the bifurcation of modern and contemporary Jewries and Judaisms.
Occupying an intermediate position between the glory of ancient Israel and the advent of the modern state, the Diaspora segment of the exhibition, meticulously-crafted scenes depicting representative examples of world Jewries throughout history at work, study, and play, was accorded a somewhat ambiguous status.
Ilan Troen appear to pull back from intimating that these Jewries will move even farther apart.
American Zionism, or the Zionism of the Jewries in Muslim countries, and the interesting Zionist figures who emerged there, are not mentioned in the book, perhaps (in the best of cases) because they belong to a later time.
See, for example, Jewries at the Frontiers: Accommodation, Identity, Conflict, ed.
In the process, he seeks to offset the overemphasis on images of Jews produced by non-Jews--and, in particular, anti-Semitic literature--that has marked the study of modern Jewries.