Jingo


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Related to Jingo: jingoism, Jango

Jingo

legendary second-century empress of Japan, victorious invader of Korea and hence the conjectural eponym of jingoism. [Jap. Hist.: EB (1963) XIII, 69]
References in periodicals archive ?
In its place, Jingo does pretty much the same things as its Japanese predecessor, yakiniku-style, in-table grilling of varied meats and separate shabu-shabu counter service.
In 1895, when Cleveland forcefully intervened on Venezuela's behalf in a border dispute with British-held Guiana, Storey declared that the administration's "demagogues go too far in the way of rousing the jingo feeling") In his devastating 1926 post-mortem, The Conquest of the Philippines by the United States, Storey argued that McKinley "sanctioned a war without the authority of Congress, he refused to parley, and he told Congress that the question would not be open until the Conquest by arms had been completed.
But don't let them pretend with their usual overload of jingo that it really mattered to their country as a whole, because it didn't.
As with any new scientific discipline, the acquisition of a new language or jingo is essential to establish credibility, so a small glossary for the beginner may be helpful.
This attitude reflected the movement's traditional, polarised worldview: the attempt to introduce 'conscription' into Australia was denounced as a plot orchestrated by jingo capitalists who wanted to reforge the shackles of old world militarism in the new and destroy democracy and trades unionism.
Signed to Columbia Records by Clive Davis, the group scored hit singles with Jingo and Evil Ways.
But if it had not been for us veterans, by jingo, there would never have been any of them.
The police said the boy, whose name is being withheld because he is a minor, told investigators that he stabbed the two -- Takeo Jingo, 66, and his wife Nobuko, 64 -- after they caught him in the act.
Taylor, the tribunes on the jingo right accuse me of cowardice or treason (not a true American, no friend of our soldiers in the field); representatives of the conscience-stricken left draw my attention to the geopolitical reality of the international oil price and Woodrow Wilson's high-minded notion of making the world safe for democracy.
La palabra procede del ingles jingo, partidario de una politica exterior agresiva.
In devoting so lengthy a study to Kipling's politics, Gilmour aims to redress two imbalances in the history of the writer's critical reception: the tendency of detractors to label Kipling as a simple jingo, and the tendency of admirers to omit consideration of his politics altogether.
The times of jingoism, when the British ruled the waves and people sang in music halls: "we don't want to fight; but by jingo, if we do; we've got the men, we've got the ships; we've got the money too", have long been over.