Jiyuto

Jiyuto

 

(Rikken Jiyuto), a constitutional liberal party, the first political party in Japan. The party was founded in October 1881 around the radical intelligentsia, liberal landowners, and the urban and rural bourgeoisie. From 1882 to 1884 there were several antigovernment demonstrations led by the left wing of the Jiyuto and supported by the peasantry. In October 1884 the party was disbanded. There was a noticeable shift to the right among the former members of Jiyuto. In 1890 the party was reestablished, and after the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-95 it began to reflect the interests of several groups of the powerful bourgeoisie (especially the Mitsui group) who were linked with the landowners. In June 1898, Jiyuto joined with Simpoto (the party of the large bourgeoisie) to form the Kenseito Party. In 1900, Kenseito served as the basis for the landowner-bourgeois party Seyukai.

References in periodicals archive ?
He battled Jiyuto (Liberal Party) leader Ichiro Ozawa, with whom he parted ways following the breakup of the faction led by late former Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita, and he suppressed the rebellion led by former LDP Secretary General Koichi Kato, who attempted to wrest power from then Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori.
Meanwhile, Jiyuto (Liberal Party) compiled in December 2000 what it called ''basic guidelines for creating a new constitution.
Since then, the composition of the ruling coalition changed frequently, starting with the coalition of the LDP, JSP and New Party Sakigake (Pioneers), followed by the LDP and Jiyuto (Liberal Party); the LDP, Jiyuto and New Komeito; and the LDP, New Komeito and Hoshuto (New Conservative Party), now Hoshushinto.
Of the opposition parties, Jiyuto (Liberal Party), the Japanese Communist Party and the Social Democratic Party are opposed to the Iraq reconstruction bill.
During a roundtable organized recently by The Yomiuri Shimbun, the secretaries general of the leading opposition party Minshuto (Democratic Party of Japan), New Komeito and Jiyuto (Liberal Party) agreed that the weapons-use restrictions should be relaxed to make them conform to those used by most other countries.
His party, Jiyuto (Liberal Party), had only about 30 members when it merged with the DPJ.
and Jiyuto (Liberal Party) leader Ichiro Ozawa, who orchestrated the implementation of the question-time system.
They went on to build up Japan once more from ruination and became the puppeteers of Japan's political structure from their powerbase in the Jiyuto (Liberal Party).
Such debates are a pillar of the system under the law to activate Diet deliberations, which was enacted in 1999 after Ozawa -- then the head of now defunct Jiyuto (Liberal Party) -- encouraged then Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi to establish such a practice in the Diet.
In 1947 he did enter the Diet as a representative of the Jiyuto (Liberal Party) under the leadership of Shigeru Yoshida (1878-1967).
There was also a rumor that the Minshuto leadership at the time, led by party president Naoto Kan, gave special consideration to Ichiro Ozawa, former Jiyuto (Liberal Party) leader, the party that merged with Minshuto late last September.
Ozawa's group--largely those who belonged to Jiyuto (Liberal Party) before the party merged with Minshuto a year ago--is keeping its distance from Okada.