Didion, Joan

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Didion, Joan

(dĭd`ēŏn), 1934–, American writer, b. Sacramento, Calif., grad. Univ. of California, Berkeley, 1956. Her works often explore the despair of contemporary American life, a condition she views as produced by the disintegration of morality and values. She is known for a cool and almost brittle style that emphasizes the concrete. Her novels include Run River (1963), A Book of Common Prayer (1977), Salvador (1983), Democracy (1984), and The Last Thing He Wanted (1996). Didion also has written screenplays (with her late husband John Gregory Dunne) as well as journalistic and critical pieces for such periodicals as the New Yorker and New York Review of Books. Among her books of essays the two most important are Slouching toward Bethlehem (1968) and The White Album (1979), both groundbreaking analyses of contemporary life and culture that combine the personal with the topical. Later essay collections include After Henry (1992) and Political Fictions (2001). Other works include Where I Was From (2003), part memoir, part disenchanted revisionist portrait of California, and the memoirs The Year of Magical Thinking (2005), an account of the grief-filled year that followed her husband's sudden death, and Blue Nights (2011), the anguished story of her grown daughter's death.

Bibliography

See studies by K. U. Henderson (1981), E. G. Friedman, ed. (1984), M. R. Winchell (rev. ed. 1989), and S. Felton, ed. (1994); documentary dir. by G. Dunne, her nephew (2017).

Didion, Joan

(1934–  ) writer; born in Sacramento, Calif. She was associate feature editor of Vogue (1956–63). Returning to California, she began to write the essays and articles that became her special genre: highly personal commentaries on contemporary events that offer a generally apocalyptic view of social disintegration in the U.S.A. Her books of essays, fiction, and reportage included Slouching Towards Bethlehem (1968), A Book of Common Prayer (1977), and Salvador (1983). She collaborated with her husband John Gregory Dunne (married 1964) on screenplays.
References in periodicals archive ?
Joan Didion, Joyce Carol Oates, and Anne Roiphe authenticate the widow's experience by their individual, eloquent records that, nevertheless, share a lot of common ground with each other and substantiate modern grief research, challenging those sceptical autobiography critics who question life writing as a credible literary genre.
In a 2012 Atlantic article, "The Autumn of Joan Didion," Flanagan combines an assessment of Didion's legacy with a review of Didion's 2011 memoir Blue Nights.
But for Joan Didion, the apparent subject of her work is never the real subject.
Writing in the late 1960s, Joan Didion offered the following assessment: "What strikes one most about the Strip chapels, with their wishing wells and stained-glass paper windows and their artificial bouvardia, is that so much of their business is by no means a matter of simple convenience, of late-night liaisons between show girls and baby Crosbys .
Chapter three analyzes how the car came to figure as a symbol of the mechanization of female bodily functions, especially maternity, during the postwar period, offering particularly compelling readings of stories by Flannery O'Connor, Joan Didion, and Toni Morrison.
Joan Didion, The White Album (1979), in We Tell Ourselves Stories in order to Live: Collected Nonfiction, New York, Knopf/Everyman, 2006, p188.
Susana Alexander siempre me sorprende", afirmo la senora Silvia Pinal, luego de la funcion que celebraba la primera temporada de El ano del pensamiento magico de Joan Didion reanudandose ahora en el Teatro Rafael Solana.
Joan Didion was, but this was before i had a lot of Jose Cuervo.
Friends like novelist Joan Didion, playwright Mart Crowley ("The Boys in the Band") and actor-producer offspring Griffin Dunne are prodded for intimate insights, but mostly it's Dunne himself who revealingly peels the layers off his personality and several careers.
Local lit heroes (past and present): The itinerant Mark Twain; Joan Didion and catty columnist Herb Caen, both natives; and current resident William T.
Highlights include the world premiere of Brian Friel's Hedda Gabler, a new production of Cat On A Hot Tin Roof and veteran actress Vanessa Redgrave portraying writer Joan Didion.
On an ordinary winter night, writer Joan Didion and her husband John returned from visiting their critically ill daughter, Quintana and sat down to dinner in their New York apartment at around 9pm.