Johann Gottfried Galle

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Galle, Johann Gottfried

 

Born June 9, 1812, in Pabsthaus; died July 10, 1910, in Potsdam. German astronomer.

Galle was director of an observatory and a university professor in Breslau (Wroclaw, 1851-95). In 1872 he established the identity of the Andromedids, a swarm of meteors, with the debris of Biela’s Comet. He discovered three comets (1839-40) and the Krepp (inner) ring of Saturn (1838). He also refined the parallax of the sun (8.87″). In 1847, Galle compiled a survey table of the elements of 178 comets for the period from 371 B.C. (with historical references). Using coordinates calculated by Leverrier, he discovered the planet Neptune on Sept. 23, 1846.

REFERENCES

Nevinskaia, A. M. “Iogann Gotfrid Galle.” Izv. Russkogo astronomicheskogo obshchestva, 1910, issue 16, no. 7.
Pannekoek, A. Istoriia astronomii. Moscow, 1966. (Translated from English.)

A. I. EREMEEVA

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Neptune is the first planet discovered by astronomical calculation, when it was subsequently observed with a telescope on September 23, 1846 by astronomer Johann Galle within a degree of the position predicted by using astronomical calculations by astronomer Urbain Le Verrier.
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1846: German astronomer Johann Galle discovered Neptune, using calculations by Frenchman Urbain le Verrier based on clues in the orbit of Uranus.
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