John Carter Brown Library


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John Carter Brown Library:

see Brown, John CarterBrown, John Carter,
1797–1874, American book collector and philanthropist, b. Providence, R.I.; son of Nicholas Brown. In about 1840 he began collecting books printed before 1800 relating to America, and the result was a remarkable library of 5,600 volumes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From 2006-2012, he served as the Beatrice and Julio Mario Santo Domingo Director and Librarian at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University.
The set now belongs to the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University.
The contributors are medievalists who came up with the idea for this collection while fellows at The John Carter Brown Library.
The site has won the support of the newly formed Alliance for Linguistic Diversity, which includes the Center for American Indian Languages, the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University and the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana.
Esta es una recopilacion de la mayoria de los trabajos presentados en el congreso Viejo Mundo y Nuevo Mundo en las Cronicas de Indias, con el auspicio de la John Carter Brown Library, el Departamento de Estudios Hispanicos de la Universidad de Brown y el Grupo de Investigacion Siglo de Oro de la Universidad de Navarra, en junio de 2010.
The John Carter Brown Library is an independently funded research library of the humanities located on the campus of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.
Tiene presente la edicion princeps de 1526 de la Biblioteca Nacional de Madrid, del Palacio Real y de la John Carter Brown Library.
The essays collected in The World of the Haitian Revolution were first presented at a conference commemorating the bicentennial and hosted by the John Carter Brown Library.
Toby Lester is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and an invited research scholar at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University.
For more than a hundred years, the John Carter Brown Library, affiliated with Brown University, has housed a rival: an undated work by the same cartographer, showing an outline virtually identical to that of a map known to have been printed in 1513.
In connection with these anniversaries, the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University in Rhode Island became the locus for a major attempt to make available to English-language readers an up-to-date and wide-ranging analysis of Portugal's early contribution to oceanic expansion.
She was the Jeannette Black Fellow at The John Carter Brown Library in 1984, a National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Scholar (1972-73), a Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellow (1968-69), and the recipient of grants from the Social Science Research Council, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Science Foundation.