John Chrysostom


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John Chrysostom

Saint. ?345--407 ad, Greek bishop and theologian; one of the Fathers of the Greek Church, noted for his eloquence. Feast day: Sept. 13
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, less than 200 years later, Saint John Chrysostom was still proclaiming, "though our hands may be already pure, unless we have washed them thoroughly, we do not raise them in prayer.
Space doesn't permit more than a mention of other summer saints such as Irenaeus, Joachim and Anne, Martha, John Vianney, Lawrence, Monica, Peter Claver, John Chrysostom.
The eloquence of John Chrysostom led to many sermons being attributed to him in the manuscript tradition.
The inclusion of two chapters on second-century biblical interpretation ("Apostolic Fathers and Apologists" and "NT Apocrypha and Gnostic Writings") is conspicuous when, at the same time, only passing mention is made of later exegetical giants like Theodore, John Chrysostom, Ambrose, Gregory of Nyssa, and Theodoret.
Jaroslav Pelikan brings together his interest in ancient rhetoric and the history of exegesis to examine the ways in which Augustine, John Chrysostom, and Luther treated the Sermon on the Mount.
At least since the beginning of the sixteenth century, however, it has been recognized that this work cannot be by its putative author, John Chrysostom, and that, indeed, it must have originated outside Nicene circles altogether.
In my hometown, our family frequents a parish where the priest is married, the deacon is chosen from the community (he is a chef by profession), and the liturgy is totally sung a cappella by the congregation according to the Byzantine rite attributed to Saint John Chrysostom.
Emphasis falls on the early Church, represented by the reception of the Septuagint and commentators Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Eusebius, Jerome, John Chrysostom, Cyril of Alexandria, and Theodoret.
The dissension centred partly on the proper interpretation of patristic authorities - mainly Athanasius, the three Cappadocians, Cyril, Severus of Antioch, and Theodosius of Alexandria, with an occasional citation from John Chrysostom.
Calvin cited John Chrysostom for exegetical, homiletic, and pastoral purposes; but for theological questions like free will he stuck to sola scriptura and warned his followers against reading the Fathers.
Later eulogists include John Chrysostom, who devoted an entire speech to his martyrdom, and the Byzantine Patriarch, Photius.
This fascinating book, the outgrowth of a doctoral dissertation at Duke University, has its inception in two treatises of John Chrysostom (ca.