John Franklin Enders


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Enders, John Franklin

 

Born Feb. 10, 1897, in West Hartford, Conn. American virologist. Member of the National Academy of Sciences (1953), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Royal Society of London.

Enders graduated from Yale University in 1920. From 1929 to 1956 he taught at Harvard University. In 1946 he became chief of the laboratory of infectious diseases at Children’s Medical Center in Boston and head of the research department of infectious diseases at Children’s Hospital, also in Boston. He became a professor at Children’s Hospital (Harvard Medical School) in 1956.

Enders’ main works deal with bacteriology, immunology, and virology. He discovered a new type of polysaccharide in pneumococcus and showed the catalytic role of complement in the opsonization of bacteria by specific antibodies. In collaboration with T. Weller and F. Robbins, Enders proved that the poliomyelitis virus is not neurotropic and developed a method of culturing the virus, thus revolutionizing virological research. He also helped develop a measles vaccine.

Enders shared a Nobel Prize in 1954 with Robbins and Weller.

References in periodicals archive ?
The American microbiologist John Franklin Enders (1897-1985) developed this technique in 1948, and it became useful in searching for ways to fight viral diseases, notably poliomyelitis (infantile paralysis).