John Reed Clubs


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John Reed Clubs

 

progressive organizations in the USA. They arose in 1929 and were named in honor of the American revolutionary writer John Reed. By 1934 there were nearly 30 clubs that had their own printed organs and brought together almost 1,200 leftist writers and correspondents from among workers. They held two national conferences, in 1932 and 1934, and joined the International Association of Revolutionary Writers. Many of the John Reed clubs fused with the League of American Writers, created in 1935.

REFERENCES

Nikoliukin, A. N. “Amerikanskaia sektsiia MORPa (Kluby Dzhona Rida).” In Literaturnoe nasledstvo, vol. 81. (Iz istorii Mezhdunarodnogo ob”edineniia revoliutsionnykh pisatelei.) Moscow, 1969.
Rideout, W. The Radical Novel in the United States (1900–1954). Cambridge, 1956.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, the pages of Philip Rahv and William Phillips' prominent leftist magazine Partisan Review were almost certainly already familiar and quite influential for the young Wright, since it served as a primary organ of the John Reed Clubs.
Wright, however, was an active member of the Communist Party throughout the 1930s, (3) and he served as head of the Chicago branch of the literary John Reed Club, published pieces in Party-sponsored and Party-friendly magazines like New Masses and Partisan Review, and rose to prominence as a poet, short story writer, literary critic, and journalist.
as a Party writer, book reviewer, journalist, and head of the Chicago John Reed Club (until the clubs were disbanded in 1935), would have been fully steeped in this decidedly heterogeneous attitude toward proletarian fiction.
The original review, launched in 1934 by the communist John Reed Clubs, was financed by the party.