Tenniel, Sir John

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Tenniel, Sir John

(tĕn`yəl), 1820–1914, English caricaturist and illustrator. He became well known for his original and good-humored political cartoons in Punch, with which he was associated from 1851 to 1901. Tenniel is also known for his illustrations of Thomas Moore's Lalla Rookh; Aesop's Fables; The Ingoldsby Legends; and, above all, Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.
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There is, for example, no space to consider the interesting way in which Peart and Levy delineate the alliance between the Evangelicals and the classical economists that formed to confront those who supported analytical hierarchism, nor to analyse the skilful way in which the authors deploy illustrations by George Cruikshank and John Tenniel to highlight the prejudices of those who advocated analytical hierarchism.
Best known today as the illustrator for Lewis Carroll's Alice books, John Tenniel was the Victorian era's chief political cartoonist.
The real Alice looked nothing like the wide-eyed, perpetually bewildered blonde created by illustrator John Tenniel for the original 1865 edition of A/ice in Wonderland.
John Leech and John Tenniel, the two most famous illustrators for Punch, shaped these two national images in the nineteenth century.
18-21 for a more complete discussion of the Disney art school begun in 1935 and the diverse sources of Disney imagery, including the importance of Heinrick Kley, John Tenniel, Lewis Carrol, Winsor McCay, among others.
Not only were these tales beautifully written, but beautifully illustrated as well by the likes of Beatrix Potter, Arthur Rackham, Rudyard Kipling and Sir John Tenniel.
Illustration 4), Yet, Bull owes much of his longevity and popularity to John Tenniel who succeeded Leech at Punch.
Dodgson revised it for publication and commissioned John Tenniel, a Punch magazine cartoonist, to make illustrations to his specifications.
Adding to its originality were the famous illustrations by Sir John Tenniel, who did not use the real Alice for his model.
He met his match in the most famous of the Alice illustrators, Sir John Tenniel, then best known for his detailed cartoons in Punch, who was commissioned by Carroll when he realised his own work wasn't good enough.
And then there are those who collect the original drawings, whether by 19th-century Punch artists such as Leech, John Tenniel (1820-1914) and Edward Linley Sambourne (1844-1910), or 20th-century giants such as Ronald Searle (1920-2011), Ronald 'Carl' Giles (1916-95) and David Low (1891-1963), or even Martin Rowson (b.