Vanbrugh, Sir John

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Vanbrugh, Sir John

(vănbro͞o`, văn`brə), 1664–1726, English dramatist, architect, soldier, and adventurer, b. London, of Flemish descent. In 1686 he obtained a commission in the army. He was arrested for espionage in 1690 and spent two years in a French prison. After his return from France he turned to writing for the stage. His first play, The Relapse (1696), was a counterblast to Colley CibberCibber, Colley
, 1671–1757, English dramatist and actor-manager. Joining the company at the Theatre Royal in 1690, Cibber became successful as a comedian, playing the fops of Restoration comedy.
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's Love's Last Shift. Vanbrugh's masterpiece, The Provoked Wife (1697), was attacked (1698) by Jeremy CollierCollier, Jeremy,
1650–1726, English clergyman. Collier was imprisoned as one of the nonjurors, who refused to pledge allegiance to William III and Mary II. He later was outlawed (1696) for absolving on the scaffold two of those involved in the assassination plot against
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 in his famous diatribe on the immorality of the English stage. Vanbrugh was an inventive playwright, imbued with the wit and cynicism that were common to the Restoration dramatists. As his reputation as an architect grew, Vanbrugh turned away from the stage. He became Wren's principal colleague and his style, expansive, ostentatious, and theatrical, is derived from Sir Christopher WrenWren, Sir Christopher,
1632–1723, English architect. A mathematical prodigy, he studied at Oxford. He was professor of astronomy at Gresham College, London, from 1657 to 1661, when he became Savilian professor of astronomy at Oxford.
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 and from Nicholas HawksmoorHawksmoor, Nicholas,
1661–1736, English architect involved in the development of most of the great buildings of the English baroque. From the age of 21 he assisted Sir Christopher Wren in the design of Chelsea Hospital, city churches, royal residences, and St.
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. His best-known buildings are Blenheim Palace (the perfect example of his genius for the heroic and a culmination of English baroque), Castle Howard, the Queen's Theatre in the Haymarket, and Seaton Delaval (one of the finest English baroque homes). Vanbrugh's later plays include The Confederacy (1705) and A Journey to London (completed by Cibber as The Provoked Husband, 1728). He was knighted in 1714.

Bibliography

See his complete works, including letters (ed. by B. Dobrée and G. Webb, 4 vol., 1927–28); biography by L. Whistler (1938, repr. 1971); study of his architecture by K. Downs (1977).

Vanbrugh, Sir John

(1664–1726)
An architect with no formal training, who designed England’s largest and most flamboyant Baroque country houses, with bold massing and dramatically varied skylines. Works include Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire.
References in periodicals archive ?
Charles Howard, the third Earl of Carlisle, created Castle Howard with the help of his friend, John Vanbrugh, who had never built a house before in his life.
The Play-House in the Hay-Market (the Architect being John Vanbrugh Esq;) .
Blenheim Palace was designed by Sir John Vanbrugh - architect of Seaton Delaval Hall in Northumberland - for John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough between 1705-1722.
Hart has been tracking backwards, from the early 18th century to the beginning of the 17th, to produce revisionist studies of three major architects of the period: two heavyweights of the English Baroque, John Vanbrugh and Nicholas Hawksmoor, and Inigo Jones, the man who introduced Vitruvian classicism to England.
Other highlights included actor Ray Alexander portraying acclaimed architect Sir John Vanbrugh, who designed Morpeth Town Hall, a Music of the Shepherds concert, folk dance workshops, storytelling sessions and competitions.
We've continued acquiring properties and we have launched an appeal for Seaton Delaval Hall, which is an extraordinary property designed by Sir John Vanbrugh.
The new Vanbrugh Theatre (named after Irene Vanbrugh, the distinguished actress, not John Vanbrugh the architect) was much larger and contrasted with the intimate George Bernard Shaw (GBS) Theatre in the basement of Gower Street.
Heroic plays influenced by principles of French Neoclassicism enjoyed a vogue, but the age is chiefly remembered for its glittering, critical comedies of manners by such playwrights as George Etherege, William Wycherley, Sir John Vanbrugh, and William Congreve.
Held against the majestic backdrop of the John Vanbrugh designed Seaton Delaval Hall (now in the hands of the National Trust), organisers Mark and Shelley Deakin of Hot StuffChilli Company fame, promise food stalls aplenty alongside some scorching entertainment, including the 2015 North East Chilli Eating Competition.
In the first episode of a two-parter, he looks back to its origins in the Martial architecture of World War II, the Modern Gothic style, which wasn't at all favoured during the Victorian era, and even further back in the time of John Vanbrugh.
The 18th Century masterpiece by architect Sir John Vanbrugh, its gardens and 400 acres of surrounding land, have now officially been acquired by the National Trust for the North East and the nation.