Josephus


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Josephus

Flavius . real name Joseph ben Matthias. ?37--?100 ad, Jewish historian and general; author of History of the Jewish War and Antiquities of the Jews
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Before embarking on an analysis of the pertinent passages in Josephus (chapters one through eight), Pummer discusses a potpourri of interrelated topics in his lengthy introductory chapter.
Perhaps the title of this book is a lure to readers that have heard Josephus was a traitor and want to see Seward's take on the lurid details.
does not, however, explore the question thus raised, even though he often notes how Josephus rewrites biblical passages to conform with the realities of his day.
Josephus (JW 1 [section]31-33) knows of a tradition that Onias founded the temple but reports later (Ant.
In fact, Josephus even describes a portent of the future greatness of Izates that is delivered to his father Monobazos before his birth.
In a revision of his 2015 doctoral dissertation at McMaster University, Krause investigates the sudden appearance of the synagogue in first-century CE Jewish history, looking at the work of Flavius Josephus for contemporary thought on the matter.
These primary sources include the writings of Tertullian, Justin Martyr, Josephus Flavius, Suetonius, and Bernard of Cluny.
Josephus, the Jewish historian (37-100 CE), had access to the text and quoted extensively from it, but it is no longer available in its original form.
Flavius Josephus was a firstcentury Roman-Jewish historian.
He sifts through the writings of Josephus, the classic four sources of the Synoptic Gospels (Mark, the hypothetical sayings source Q, special Matthean material, and special Lukan material), the Gospel of Thomas, the Gospel of John, and published archaeological reports.
Craig's biography of Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels.
Josephus Daniels rose from near poverty to own and edit newspapers, most notably the Raleigh News and Observer, and through these papers and an understanding of the people of North Carolina dominated the state's politics for four decades as a populist reformer and shaper of the white supremacist movement.