Jovian planet


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Related to Jovian planet: Dwarf planet

Jovian planet

[′jō·vē·ən ¦plan·ət]
(astronomy)
Any of the four major planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) that are at a greater distance from the sun than the terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars).
References in periodicals archive ?
A photometric accuracy of less than 1% is necessary to detect Jovian planets around Sun-like stars.
According to Boss, even if a Jovian planet took a few million years to form, as in the core-accretion model, that's still not enough time for Earth-size planets to have coalesced in the inner part of a protoplanetary disk.
All four Jovian planets have inner cores made of rock, metal, and hydrogen materials.
The Jovian planets have differential internal rotations which bring their angular momentum uncertainties to more than 10% also.
So Jupiter and the jovian planets are stars in an early stage of their evolution.
The number of models for bringing Jovian planets close to their parent stars now roughly equals the number of planets detected.
Using this equation (11), we could predict quantization of celestial orbits in the solar system, where for Jovian planets we use least-square method and use M in terms of reduced mass [micro] = ([M.
Furthermore, the four terrestrial planets and the four large Jovian planets are similar to one another in that they all dominate their respective parts of the solar system.
Eventually objects following such tracks will pass close to one of the Jovian planets, whose gravitational influence will change the introder's orbit significantly and perhaps drastically.