judiciary

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judiciary

1. the branch of the central authority in a state concerned with the administration of justice
2. the system of courts in a country
3. the judges collectively; bench
References in periodicals archive ?
With the hindsight of nearly eighty years, we know that Pritchett's seemingly small project helped to create a big field (18): Judicial Behavior, which I take to be the theoretical and empirical study (19) of the choices judges make.
21) Although there has been a renaissance of scholarship on judicial behavior, Hall's focus here is a little different because she analyzes attack advertising's impact on electoral outcomes rather than how the electoral process affects judges.
Legal scholars and political scientists alike tend to depict judicial behavior as a function of the legal views and policy preferences that judges hold, subject to constraints imposed by the political environment.
authors purport to seek to measure a judicial behavior response to the
i) Judicial behavior effects: More MTDs might be granted in cases that would have MTDs filed under either pleading regime.
Social scientists, after all, have supported the Judicial Political Realist account with empirical evidence, (122) and the rationales offered in White and Stop the Beach Renourishment present at least plausible accounts of judicial behavior.
For some years I have been arguing for a realistic approach to understanding judicial behavior.
Once one takes law seriously, the question arises if we can conceptualize judicial behavior as a choice between political or judicial action.
13) Descriptions of even virtuous judging must not fail to take into account what Frederick Schauer calls "the inglorious determinants of judicial behavior.
What Nagel finds so morally anomalous in modern judicial behavior, Posner identifies as the norm.
There remains deep skepticism in legal circles toward interdisciplinary empirical scholarship aimed at capturing the impact of ideology on judicial behavior.
LEGAL ETHICS 1037, 1043 (2001) (noting that all fifty states and the District of Columbia have established judicial discipline organizations in order to "review and supervise judicial behavior and reprimand errant judges").

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