foreclosure

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foreclosure

The depriving of the right to a property by legal transfer of title, esp. because of failure to maintain mortgage payments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lost note affidavits are addressed in detail, following the existing rules that they are required in judicial foreclosures but not in nonjudicial foreclosures.
While most of the coverage on this issue has focused on GMAC Mortgage Services to date, "Any servicer with a significant portion of their portfolio in judicial foreclosure states will be either directly or indirectly impacted by the attention focused on this problem," said Diane Pendley, Managing Director and Head of U.
Darren Soto, D-Orlando, proposed an amendment giving homesteaded owners up to 90 days to request a judicial foreclosure, and allow them to do so by filing a notice rather than a circuit court action.
5 million loans being serviced in Florida, 374,134 are in the judicial foreclosure process.
Figure 1 - Number of Mortgaged Homes per Completed Foreclosure Judicial Foreclosure States vs.
1 percent of judicial foreclosure inventory has moved to sale in a given month as compared with about 6.
The servicer moves for appointment of a referee--the next step in a New York foreclosure (and common in many other judicial foreclosure states).
The property is 100% vacant and the special servicer has initiated judicial foreclosure.
A key factor is that the city is located in a judicial foreclosure state.
MedCap agrees for 100 days from June 1, 2005 (as long as another default does not occur) to forbear from (i) recording Notices of Default under its Credit Agreement with IHHI, (ii) filing a judicial foreclosure lawsuit against IHHI, OC-PIN and West Coast Holdings, LLC, and (iii) filing lawsuits against IHHI, OC-PIN and West Coast Holdings, LLC;
Figure 2 - Foreclosure Inventory as of November 2014 Judicial Foreclosure States vs.
Some judicial foreclosure states are also improving, like Florida, but not to the extent of non-judicial markets.

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