judy

(redirected from Judies)
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judy

In air interception, a code meaning, “My radar has locked onto the contact and no further assistance is required.” This is not a very commonly used term.
References in periodicals archive ?
Judies Child can race off just a 1lb higher mark than the one she finished runner-up off at Dundalk three weeks ago.
In the end it was the effort, research, hard work and inspiration which went into Punch and Judies idea that won the day.
He wishes to clarify that in Liverpool's north end, wives and girlfriends were often referred to as "my judy", as in the sea shanty "the Liverpool judies have got me in tow
For, with their melody and poetry, they carry us far away from the soulless hum of computers to the dawn of music, through all the human passions, stopping along the way to consider wars and those who spill the blood of the innocent - chastity belts and wicked kings, mining disasters, storms on the high seas, cabin boys and crazy captains, cotton fields and their lamentations, John Barleycorn, new factories and old fields, slimy politicians and business men, foaming jokes, noble knights and fair maidens, Liverpool judies, huddled refugees, and great trains rolling across the prairies to promised lands.
Chief whipperinner Pat Moran said: "It's the city's best daytime club, with the finest Liverpool Judies in attendance - some even have their own teeth.
AFTER Mr Brocklebank revealed that Liverpool City Council wags refer to Labour group female members as "Joe's Judies", in tribute to their dear leader Cllr Joe Anderson, newlyelected "Judy", Cllr Louise Baldock writes: "Unfamiliar with the term 'Judies' I have 'googled' it and found out that Liverpool Judies were prostitutes who served sailors.
LAST Wednesday, around 2pm, after the Freedom of Liverpool scrolls dedicated to the Merchant Navy were ceremonially placed in St Nicholas's parish church, sundry old salts and their judies needed a tot of Nelson's Blood.
Soon the conversation is dripping with wet nellies, shawlies, de parish, lads, tarts and judies, auld fellers and auld gerls, the dockers' umbreller, left-footers, tallymen, proddy-dogs, conny-onny, ollies, and gerls with faces like ruptured custard.