Julian calendar


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Related to Julian calendar: Gregorian calendar, Julian date

Julian calendar

the calendar introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 bc, identical to the present calendar in all but two aspects: the beginning of the year was not fixed on Jan. 1 and leap years occurred every fourth year and in every centenary year

Julian calendar

(joo -lee-ăn) The calendar that was established in 46 bc in the Roman Empire by Julius Caesar, with Sosigenes of Alexandria as his chief advisor. It reached its final form in about 8 ad under Augustus and was in general use in the West up to 1582, when the Gregorian calendar was instituted. Each year contained 12 months and there was an average of 365.25 days per year: three years of 365 days were followed by a leap year of 366 days. (Leap years were not correctly inserted until 8 ad.) Since the average length of the year was about 11 minutes 15 seconds longer than the 365.2422 days of the tropical year, a discrepancy arose between the calendar year and the seasons, with an extra day ‘appearing’ about every 128 years.

Julian Calendar

 

(also Old Style), the calendar introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 B.C. The calendar fixed the length of the year as 365¼ days. (The actual length of the tropical year is 365 days, 5 hours, 48 min, and 46 sec.) This figure is obtained by inserting an additional day every four years—February 29 in the modern calendar. With the Julian calendar, the leap years are those that are evenly divisible by four, for example, 1900, 1904, 1972, and 1976. The difference between the New Style (Gregorian calendar) and Old Style amounted to 11 days in the 18th century and 12 days in the 19th century. In the 20th century, the difference amounts to 13 days. The shift from one style to the other has no effect on the day of the week.


Julian Calendar

 

(Old Style), a system of chronology introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 B.C. In the Julian calendar, every year that is divisible by 4, for example, 1900, 1976, and 1980, is considered a leap year; thus, the average length of a year is 365.25 days, which is 0.0078 day longer than the tropical year.

Since the error in the Julian calendar constitutes about three days every 400 years, it was replaced by the Gregorian calendar (New Style) beginning in 1582; in the USSR the Gregorian calendar was introduced February 14 (February 1 Old Style), 1918. The difference between the New and Old styles was 11 days in the 18th century and 12 days in the 19th century; in the 20th century it is 13 days. In the event of a change from one style to another, the day of the week does not change; thus, both May 1, 1979, New Style and Apr. 18, 1979, Old Style fall on Tuesday.

Julian calendar

[′jül·yən ′kal·ən·dər]
(astronomy)
A calendar (replaced by the Gregorian calendar) in which the year was 365.25 days, with the fraction allowing for an extra day every fourth year (leap year); there were 12 months, each 30 or 31 days except for February which had 28 days or in leap year 29.
References in periodicals archive ?
Agreement on the Aleppo principles for common future dates of the observance of Easter/Pascha would entail a major adjustment for most Orthodox churches, since the Julian calendar calculations on Which they base their observance departs in most years from both Gregorian calendar calculations and the more precise modern astronomical calculations.
In order to restore the vernal equinox to its perceived correct place on March 25, the Julian calendar fixed the mean length of the year to 365.
Only in the Julian Calendar would the two days coincide, although if Gregory had made James ten days older, one could argue that he had also relocated his accession from 24 March 1602 to 3 April 1603.
The date of the equinox was arbitrarily set as March 21, which of course was inaccurate because the Julian calendar had already lost about three days.
1) Some churches have kept entirely the Julian calendar.
In 1752, when British citizens and American colonials were in an uproar about the confusion between the old Julian calendar system and the newly-implemented Gregorian calendar, John Powell of Birmingham, England, created calendar medals to help average citizens determine the correct date.
SAO PAULO, April 1, 2015 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- The practice of playing April Fool's Day pranks and jokes on people dates all the way back to the 1500s, marking the changeover from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar.
Whose birthday is considered to be November 7, 1728, but according to a local memorial plaque on a stone from 1770 his birth date is given as October 27, 1728, in accordance with the old Julian calendar used until 1752?
When the Julian calendar was suddenly changed to Gregorian calendar - which is an internationally accepted calendar even today, it caused confusion and troubles to people.
1582: Pope Gregory XIII announced the new Gregorian calendar, replacing the less accurate Julian calendar that had got out of line with astronomical reality over many centuries.
To add to the confusion, the Russian Orthodox Church still adheres to the Julian calendar which is now 13 days behind the Gregorian, so our December 27 is January 9 in the Julian version.
The Orthodox Holy Nativity Liturgy is always celebrated on the Old Julian calendar but culturally and socially since after the Oslo Peace Agreement (1993) all Christians have united to celebrate Christmas day on December 25th.