Potter Stewart

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Stewart, Potter,

1915–85, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1958–81), b. Jackson, Mich. After receiving (1941) his law degree from Yale, he was admitted to the Ohio bar. He later practiced law in Cincinnati. A U.S. Circuit Court judge from 1954 to 1958, he was appointed by President Eisenhower to replace Harold H. Burton on the Supreme Court. An advocate of the careful exercise of judicial review, Stewart limited his decisions to narrow questions of law and rarely ruled on broad constitutional issues.

Stewart, Potter

(1915–85) Supreme Court justice; born in Jackson, Mich. He was in private practice and involved in Cincinnati politics when he was appointed to the U.S. Court of Appeals (1954–58). President Eisenhower named him to the U.S. Supreme Court (1959–81) where he took independent and moderate judicial positions.
References in periodicals archive ?
In London yesterday, Sir Brian Leveson, sitting with Mr Justice Kenneth Parker and Mr Justice Stewart, said that Salisbury, who had no previous convictions, was married to a serving soldier based in Germany but was estranged from him at the time.
As previously mentioned, Justice Stewart wrote a lone dissent in Engel.
Sitting with Mr Justice Sitting with Mr Justice Stewart and Mr Justice Lewis, he concluded: "What each of the appellants might at least care to bear in mind, and will no doubt think of for the rest of their lives, is that they were involved in an incident in which - one way or another - Jonathan Fitchett came to die.
However, Mr Justice Nicol, sitting with Lady Justice Sharp and Mr Justice Stewart, ruled that Williams deserved every single day of his sentence.
Mr Justice Stewart told the Court of Appeal that Duncan already had a bad criminal record when he was stopped.
But, sitting with Lord Justice Pitchford and Mr Justice Stewart, he added that Baker deserved to be jailed for the harrassment of his former wife.
Earlier this month, he took his claim for damages to the High Court and was yesterday guaranteed a payout when Mr Justice Stewart ruled his disabilities were the result of medical negligence.
matter," Justice Stewart explained, these two sequences were
As Justice Stewart wrote in dissent in Griswold, the facts of the case did not involve:
Mr Justice Stewart said: "Nobody should underestimate the suffering that you have caused to others by what you did on that day.
Lord Justice Leveson, sitting with Mr Justice Kenneth Parker and Mr Justice Stewart, agreed and substituted the indeterminate IPP sentence.
But Justice Stewart Austin cited the 'transportability of [her] husband's mementoes' as weighing in Mrs Moss's favour when deciding who should get the farm when their joint assets were carved up, the report added.