K'ang-hsi

K'ang-hsi

(käng shē), 1654–1722, 2d emperor of the Ch'ing dynasty of China (1661–1722). He extended Manchu control and promoted learning in the arts and sciences. K'ang-hsi conquered the feudatories of S China (1673–81), took Taiwan (1683), established China's first diplomatic relations with Russia (1689), and pushed the Ölöds from Outer Mongolia (1697). Repeated tax reductions, attention to water conservation, and imperial tours of inspection earned him a reputation for benevolence. He employed Jesuit missionaries to map the empire and to teach mathematics and astronomy.

Bibliography

See study by J. D. Spence (1974).

References in periodicals archive ?
Slight inaccuracies concerning Fang's early career and his involvement in the persecution of Tai Ming-shih do not detract from Guy's perceptive observations, through Fang Pao, about changing relations between emperors and their chief scholar-servitors during the late K'ang-hsi, Yung-cheng, and early Ch'ien-lung periods.
In "Learning Mathematical Sciences during the Early and Mid-Ch'ing," Catherine Jami explicates the rise of interest in mathematics in the late Ming and early Ch'ing and outlines an evolution in Chinese attitudes toward Western knowledge during that period, showing how the indigenous and European methods in mathematics were syncretized during the K'ang-hsi reign.