kava


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kava

or

kavakava

(kä`vəkä'və): see pepperpepper,
name for the fruits of several unrelated Old and New World plants used as spices or vegetables or in medicine. Old World (True) Peppers

Black pepper (Piper nigrum
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.

Kava

 

(also, kavakava, Piper methysticum), a shrub of the family Piperaceae (pepper). It grows on the Polynesian Islands and New Guinea. The local population uses the stems, leaves, and rhyzomes of the plant to make a stimulating and highly intoxicating beverage.

References in periodicals archive ?
Their analysis across a variety of cultivars has revealed that native kava drinkers knew about them too.
It's known as kava time," says Chris Kilham, an expert on traditional medicinal plants and author of 14 books including Kava: Medicine Hunting in Paradise.
Lead researcher Jerome Sarris from the University of Melbourne Department of Psychiatry stated that they've been able to show that kava offers a potential natural alternative for the treatment of chronic clinical anxiety.
Studies examining the effects of chronic and very high doses of kava in traditional users have shown that such elevated doses result in specific problems with coordination and visual attention but do not impair visual searching, pattern recognition or associative learning (Cairney 2003a, Cairney 2003b, LaPorte 2011).
It has been hypothesized that kava induces liver toxicity through two mechanisms: first, it affects cytochrome P450 enzyme activities causing herb-drug interactions (Clayton et al.
Teschke R, Schulze J, Risk of kava hepatotoxicity and the FDA consumer advisory JAMA 2010:304:2174-2175
Kava may be associated with melioidosis in some aboriginal communities in northern Australia (10).
When he took a sip of the kava,which is said to taste like medicine, the crowd broke into applause.
However, Cox and King had planned an additional step that they see as rendering the spirit of the requirement into Samoan culture, where major decisions are made at a kava ceremony.
Using pieces of the fibrous husk of the coconut, some boys and young men are now removing the dirt from newly unearthed kava roots.
Kava, passionflower, oatstraw, chamomile, lemon balm, skullcap, and catnip are all mildly sedating herbs that can replace smoking in times of stress, reduce the agitation of quitting, and also provide nourishment for the nervous system.