Kaddish


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Kaddish

a prayer said for a close relative. [Judaism: Jobes, II, 901]
See: Grief
References in periodicals archive ?
Family and cultural traditions, in particular the recitation of the Kaddish, provide some framework for mourning; however, having been raised in a Communist, atheist household, Robin experiences a great deal of ambivalence toward the Jewish rites of mourning.
And the kaddish, whose literary brilliance he celebrates, envelopes not just one's parents' life, but the lives of all the dead, especially the victims of the Holocaust.
El Kaddish, la oracion judia de los difuntos, sirve a Kertesz para hablar del hijo que se nego a tener porque haberlo concebido era "hacerle el juego" a Auschwitz.
And, as Armstrong adds, he adopted a similar light-fingered approach when it came to naming the 13-minute piece, the title being a direct lift from an early Allen short story called No Kaddish For Weinstein (Kaddish is a Hebrew prayer).
After the former president died in 1885, synagogues throughout the nation (perhaps not in the South) said kaddish for him.
The Kaddish prayer was also read out as an address to God in the memory of those who fell in the Holocaust.
6) There is no mention that allowing women to say Kaddish in the synagogue is the position taken by late leading Lithuanian halakhic authorities of the past generation, including Rabbis Hayyim Ozer Grodzinski, Yosef Eliyahu Henkin, and Joseph B.
The Kaddish is a prayer that every devote Jew recites as part of mourning the loss of a loved one.
Finally translated into English, Fiasco joins its companion novels, Fatelessness and Kaddish for an Unborn Child, in the trilogy that won Kertesz the Nobel Prize in Literature.
EM Broner was the author of 10 books, including The Women's Haggadah, Weave Of Women and Mourning: A Kaddish Journal.
When Dad couldn't make it to the synagogue, he would call me beforehand, and I would seek out a temple in town and say the Kaddish in his stead.
As my title implies, with its juxtaposition of the Jewish-American religious icons of Manishevitz wine and the kaddish, the traditional Jewish prayer often said in mourning, with the Eastern traditions of sake, Japanese rice wine, and sutras, Hindu and later Buddhist metaphysical or religious aphoristic verses, I read Allen Ginsberg as a profoundly transnational and spiritually syncretistic poet.