Karaite


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Karaite

 

the language of the Karaites, who live in cities of the Crimean Oblast and several other oblasts of the Ukrainian SSR, in Trakai Raion of the Lithuanian SSR, and in Poland. Karaite belongs to the Kipchak group of Turkic languages. It has three dialects: northern (Trakai), southern (Galich), and Crimean. Karaite syntax has been influenced by the Slavic languages (for example, postposition of the genitive case of the attributive, agreement of the attributive and the qualified member in number and case, and relatively free word order). Since 1840, Karaite has used the Hebrew, Latin, and Slavic orthographies for transcribing religious texts, secular literature, and folklore.

REFERENCES

Musaev, K. M. Grammatika karaimskogo iazyka: Fonetika i morfologiia. Moscow, 1964.
Musaev, K. M. “Karaimskii iazyk.” In Iazyki narodov SSSR, vol. 2. Moscow, 1966.
Pritsak, O. “Das Karaimische.” In Philologiae Turcicae Fundamenta, vol. 1. Wiesbaden, 1959.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Karaite position is based upon their approach to Scripture.
In a philosophical work entitled EtzHaChayyim (Tree of Life), Aaron ben Elijah of Nicomedia discussed the Karaite views about Oral Tradition.
Yeshaya presents a cycle of 100 poems on the parashot by 12th-century Egyptian Karaite poet Moses Dar'i.
Within this idyll we find a delicious slice of Turkey, courtesy of the Karaites, descendants of those who came from the Crimea in the 15th Century to serve as fortress guardians.
The law enumerates nine traditional religious communities: Latin Rite Catholics (Roman Catholics), Greek Rite Catholics, Evangelical Lutherans, Evangelical Reformed Churchgoers, Orthodox Christians (Moscow Patriarchate), Old Believers, Jews, Sunni Muslims, and Karaites.
The writing occasionally sparkles with the inventiveness we are used to with Ozick: "The Karaites, [the rabbis] say, see only the letters; they do not see the halo of meaning that glows around the letters"; or the description of physicists as "a band of mystics pursuing imagined angels: waves and particles
Does this make me a Karaite, a Reform Jew, or maybe
Tradition" refers to Jewish groups such as Ashkenazi, Sephardi, Yemenite, or Karaite.
If we believe the testimony of Salman ben Yeruham, A Karaite Jewish author, writing about A.
It was given to the Karaite synagogue of Jerusalem where it was held along with another codex, known as the Cairo Codex, for over a century.
But Saadia's view was rejected in his own lifetime, particularly by his Karaite adversaries, who contended that he had lost his senses.
William Kolbrener, "Love of God in the Age of the Philosophers: Mary Asteil, Occasionalism, and the Metaphysicals"; Golda Akhiezer, "The Karaite Issac hen Abraham of Troki and his Polemics against Rabbanites": and Daniel J.