Katyn Massacre

(redirected from Katyn Forest)

Katyn Massacre

mass murder of 4250 Polish officers during WWII (c. 1939). [Polish Hist.: NCE, 1457]
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Poles remember well dozens of thousands of Polish officers and soldiers being shot to death by the Soviet regime in Katyn Forest, and prolonged Soviet control of Poland, together with the other East European countries.
At least 22,000 captured Polish officers, police and intellectuals were shot dead and most buried in Russia's Katyn Forest in 1940.
Some 22,000 members of the Polish officer corps captured by the Russians were executed by the NKVD, the Soviet secret police, at the Katyn Forest in Russia where the prisoners were being held.
His father was one of the 22,500 Polish officers killed by Soviets in 1940 in the Katyn forest after the Nazis and the Soviet Union overran the country.
Western leaders were aware of Soviet war crimes against Poland, such as the 1940 Katyn Forest Massacre, in which Soviet officials murdered thousands of captured Polish army officers and intellectual leaders.
Karski, who escaped the Soviets' Katyn Forest Massacre of Polish officers in 1940, ultimately immigrated to the U.
One of the most painful episodes of all was the Soviet killing of 22,000 Polish officers in the Katyn forest, an attempt to eliminate a swath of the country's elite.
All communication ceased in spring 1940, when Captain Krasicki was among the 4,000 Polish POWs at the Starobelsk camp executed by the NKVD--one contingent of the many slaughtered by the operation now called the Katyn Forest massacre.
The Soviet secret police (NKVD) ("People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs") executed these prisoners in Katyn forest and other locations, and buried the bodies in mass graves.
It was in stark contrast to the work that opened the concert, Panufnik's Katyn Epitaph which he dedicated to the "15,000 Polish patriots who were slaughtered while completely defenceless" in the Katyn Forest, in Russia, in 1943.
2) The Katyn Forest was one the various locations of their execution.
The Katyn Forest massacre exemplifies best how Soviet Russia misperceived the gains in cooperating with Germany in the removal of Poland from the map of Europe because according to the authors, the Soviet decision to execute Polish POWs and bury them in the Katyn Forest is a foreign policy decision that falls into three domain; morality, intelligence and policy.