Keck Telescopes

Keck Telescopes

Two 10-meter diameter Ritchey–Chrétien telescopes housed at the W.M. Keck Observatory on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Built and operated by the California Association for Research in Astronomy (CARA), an organization whose Board of Directors includes representatives from the California Institute of Technology and the University of California, they are the world's largest reflecting telescopes, operating at optical and infrared wavelengths. The establishment of both the telescopes and the observatory was made possible by grants from the W.M. Keck Foundation. The first telescope, Keck I, was completed in 1992 and became operational in May 1993. Keck II was constructed 85 meters away, making it possible for the pair to be used as an optical interferometer; it began working as a science instrument in October 1996.

Both telescopes have a segmented primary mirror (f/1.75) composed of 36 hexagonal segments, each 1.8 meters across and made of Zerodur. In each case, the assembly is controlled with active optics. Interchangeable secondary mirrors allow optical or infrared observations at either a Cassegrain or two Nasmyth foci. The telescopes are also equipped with several spectrographs and spectrometers for operation in the visible (0.3–1 μm), near-infrared (1–5 μm), and mid-infrared (5–27 μm) wavebands.

In 1996, NASA joined CARA in running the W.M. Keck Observatory and made the observatory a cornerstone of its Origins program.

References in periodicals archive ?
3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope, where BU is a partner institution, and Blanton hopes to secure time on the Hubble Space Telescope and one of the twin 10-meter Keck telescopes in Hawaii to get even more precise measurements.
org/) Keck Telescopes on Manua Kea, Hawaii, and, most recently, the (https://public.
The drive to the Keck telescopes takes 20-30 minutes, mostly by dirt road.
By contrast, the Keck Telescopes in Hawaii each have 36 mirrors set together to make a 10-meter instrument; combined, the glass for each Keck telescope weighs 18 tons.
Washington, December 5 ( ANI ): Astronomers have combined the observing powers of ESA's Herschel space observatory and the ground-based Keck telescopes and characterized hundreds of previously unseen starburst galaxies, revealing extraordinary high star-formation rates across the history of the universe.
Spotted using one of the Keck telescopes in Hawaii, S0-102 dethrones another stellar sprinter called S0-2, which takes a comparatively pokey 16 years to orbit the black hole.
Meanwhile a comprehensive study of hundreds of galaxies observed by the Keck telescopes in Hawaii and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has revealed an unexpected pattern of change that extends back 8 billion years, or more than half the age of the universe.
Behind it in the league table of size, there were around a dozen telescopes worldwide with apertures of between 8 and 10 metres, including the two American 10m Keck Telescopes and the Japanese 8.
They were the famous Keck telescopes, most powerful in the world at that time.
Not since the 1980s, when the last generation of big telescopes was built, led by the twin 33-foot Keck telescopes on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, has there been such an air of anticipation in astronomy.
The Keck Telescopes are the world's largest optical telescopes, with the primary mirror of each of the 25-meter-tall telescopes measuring 10m in dia.
That changed last November, as Marcy's team peered into the heavens through the most powerful optical telescopes in the world: the twin Keck telescopes, located on a remote Hawaiian volcano summit.