Kenites

Kenites

(kēn`īts), in the Bible, wilderness nomadic tribe friendly to the Hebrews. They came with the Hebrews and inhabited S Palestine up to the time of David. Moses' father-in-law was a Kenite, and so was the husband of Jael. Scholars have argued that the Israelites were introduced to the worship of God by the Kenites (the so-called Kenite hypothesis). The genealogy of Cain in the Book of Genesis may contain Kenite traditions.
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References in classic literature ?
Blessed above women shall Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite be,
The articles by Gass deal with critical and historical questions concerning peoples who appear in Judges: Amalekites, Kenites, the locale Maon and the Meuintes, Midianites, and the standard Deuteronomistic catalog of seven peoples, with special attention given to Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites.
The Kenites began as a metal-working group in the Arabah in the thirteenth/twelfth centuries, then pushed into the central Negev in the eleventh/tenth centuries.
He first assembles his troops, approaches the Amalekite city, and warns the Kenites to stay clear of the fighting.
The Yahweh-worshipping Midianites and Kenites had their homeland in "northwestern Arabia east of the Gulf of Aqabah," he writes on page 28.
David Schloen, "Caravans, Kenites, and Casus Belli: Enmity and Alliance in the Song of Deborah," Catholic Biblical Quarterly 55 [1993]: 18-38.
Quoting from Numbers 24:20 concerning the Israelites' triumphs over the Amekelites and Kenites, Robinson insisted the Battle of Gravelines was an occasion no less miraculous than the biblical Deborah's victory: "The same prophecy may be by all similitudes most aptly applyed unto the present action sent now at hand, as by the Spanish Amelek and Roman Kenite.
Berechiah explains that Jethro converted and then returned to Midian in order to convert the rest of the Kenites, who later came to live in Israel (Judg.
60-62) and then as a modern etiological explanation of the prominent role of the Kenites (pp.