Kenites

Kenites

(kēn`īts), in the Bible, wilderness nomadic tribe friendly to the Hebrews. They came with the Hebrews and inhabited S Palestine up to the time of David. Moses' father-in-law was a Kenite, and so was the husband of Jael. Scholars have argued that the Israelites were introduced to the worship of God by the Kenites (the so-called Kenite hypothesis). The genealogy of Cain in the Book of Genesis may contain Kenite traditions.
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Blessed above women shall Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite be,
Genesis 4 can be viewed as a continuation of the metaphor, detailing man's moral development set within the context of a tradition which attributed the important developments of human civilization such as agriculture, domestic herding, urbanization, metallurgy, and the invention of musical instruments to the Kenites (a nomadic tribe claiming to be descendants of Cain).
On that day the Lord made a covenant with Abram, saying, "To your descendants 1 give this land, from the river of Egypt to the great river, the river Euphrates, the land of the Kenites, the Kenizzites, the Kadmonites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Rephaim, the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Girgashites, and the Jebusites.
The articles by Gass deal with critical and historical questions concerning peoples who appear in Judges: Amalekites, Kenites, the locale Maon and the Meuintes, Midianites, and the standard Deuteronomistic catalog of seven peoples, with special attention given to Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites.
This now-defunct theory argued that Yahweh worship began not with the Israelites (or even with the Egyptians) but with the Kenites, or Midianites--and that Jethro transmits the cult to the Israelites.
The Yahweh-worshipping Midianites and Kenites had their homeland in "northwestern Arabia east of the Gulf of Aqabah," he writes on page 28.
Furthermore, both she and the woman who killed Abimelech kill with domestic instruments: a hammer and tent peg (the Kenites were apparently metal workers, so the choice may be emblematic), and a mill-stone for grinding corn.
Quoting from Numbers 24:20 concerning the Israelites' triumphs over the Amekelites and Kenites, Robinson insisted the Battle of Gravelines was an occasion no less miraculous than the biblical Deborah's victory: "The same prophecy may be by all similitudes most aptly applyed unto the present action sent now at hand, as by the Spanish Amelek and Roman Kenite.
Even from the Jewish point of view this seemed natural, since Kenites (understood to be Arabs) had been involved as Moses' allies in the first conquest, and the second should recapitulate it.
David Schloen, Caravans, Kenites, and Casus Belli: Enmity and Alliance in the Song of Deborah, 55 Cath.
He first assembles his troops, approaches the Amalekite city, and warns the Kenites to stay clear of the fighting.
David Schloen, "Caravans, Kenites, and Casus Belli: Enmity and Alliance in the Song of Deborah," Catholic Biblical Quarterly 55 [1993]: 18-38.