Kennelly, Arthur Edwin


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Kennelly, Arthur Edwin

(kĕn`əlē), 1861–1939, American electrical engineer, b. Bombay (now Mumbai), India, educated at University College School, London. He was Edison's chief electrical assistant (1887–94) and was later professor at Harvard (1902–30) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1913–24). Much of his research was on electromagnetism and alternating currents. In 1902 he advanced the theory, also proposed by Oliver Heaviside, that a layer of ionized air in the upper atmosphere might deflect downward electromagnetic waves. The theory was demonstrated as fact, and the deflecting layer is known as the Heaviside-Kennelly layer (see ionosphereionosphere
, series of concentric ionized layers forming part of the upper atmosphere of the earth from around 30 to 50 mi (50 to 80 km) to 250 to 370 mi (400 to 600 km) where it merges with the magnetosphere, the region of the Van Allen radiation belts.
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).

Kennelly, Arthur Edwin

 

Born Dec. 17, 1861, in Bombay; died June 18, 1939, in Boston. American engineer. From 1887 to 1894 he was T. Edison’s chief assistant; from 1902 to 1930 he was a professor at Harvard University, and from 1913 to 1924 he taught electrical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

In 1902, almost simultaneously with O. Heaviside, Kennelly proposed a hypothesis according to which electromagnetic waves are reflected by an electrically conductive atmospheric layer, which came to be known as the Kennelly-Heaviside layer (the E layer of the ionosphere).

Kennelly, Arthur Edwin

(1861–1939) electrical engineer; born in Bombay, India. Raised in England, he left school at age 13 and taught himself physics while working as a telegrapher. He emigrated to the U.S.A. in 1887 to become Edison's electrical assistant; he left in 1894 to be a consulting engineer, then taught at Harvard (1902–30) and occasionally at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a pioneer in the use of mathematical models to explain electrical phenomena. He explained the path of radio waves and deduced the existence of an atmospheric ionized reflecting layer, the Kennelly-Heaviside layer.