Kepler's supernova

Kepler's supernova

[′kep·lərz ¦sü·pər′nō·və]
(astronomy)
A supernova that appeared in the constellation Ophiuchus in October 1604 and was visible until March 1606.
References in periodicals archive ?
After comparing it with similar curves, such as that of Kepler's Supernova of 1604, he categorized SN 1572 as a Type I object that showed a linear decrease in brightness.
Astronomers have used a very long Chandra observation of the remnant of Kepler's supernova to deduce that the supernova was triggered by an interaction between a white dwarf and a red giant star.
Using the Suzaku satellite's X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS), the astronomers observed the remnant of Kepler's supernova in 2009 and 2011.
As a result of this work, SN1604 is now also known as Kepler's Supernova.
A nova in 1572 was recorded by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe and another appeared in 1604, known as Kepler's Supernova.
It was the exploding star now known as Kepler's supernova, the last one that astronomers have witnessed in the Milky Way (SN: 12/11/04, p.
The proceedings of the international conference, which took place in Padua on 16-19 June 2004 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the appearance of Kepler's Supernova, are collected in this publication.
Although the 1604 eruption, now known as Kepler's supernova, incinerated within seconds, the shock wave from the blast endures.
For example, the observations of the remnant of Kepler's supernova in 1604 and the recent supernova PTF 11kx have shown evidence that the companion star is a red giant.
We now call it Kepler's Supernova (S&T: May 2003, page 47).
Fortunately, 400 years is not long in astronomical terms, and we calculated that if we detected dust in the expanding gas cloud marking the position of Kepler's supernova, that dust would have to have been formed by the supernova rather than being preexisting dust swept up by the expanding cloud.