Kerouac


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Kerouac

Jack, real name Jean-Louis Lebris de K?rouac. 1922--69, US novelist and poet of the Beat Generation. His works include On the Road (1957) and Big Sur (1962)
References in periodicals archive ?
As suggested in this essay, the more Kerouac's critical persona becomes manifest in The Dharma Bums, the more anomalous and alien Kerouac becomes to his American audience.
As a cadet, Kerouac claimed to have manipulated his psychoanalyst in order to be discharged from service.
Kerouac, who slept with men many times, nonetheless made sure to project a decidedly macho image.
To make this case, I discuss three key figures who offer a revealing window into the long life of Beat Buddhism: Gary Snyder, Jack Kerouac, and Tom Robbins, the latter of whom postdates the Beat period but influentially carries on Beat values, aesthetics, and motifs.
Like all of Kerouac's works, On the Road is heavily autobiographical, with Kerouac represented by narrator Sal Paradise and with other characters representing Beat compatriots such as Neal Cassady (Dean Moriarty), Allen Ginsberg (Carlo Marx), and William Burroughs (Old Bull Lee).
La lengua francesa tuvo un impacto mayusculo en todo el proceso de escritura de Kerouac.
The simplest explanation seems to be that Kerouac, having gorged himself on Henry Miller and Walt Whitman, attempted to mimic in prose the phrasing of jazz improvisation.
For more than 50 years, Gerd Stern had been wrongly accused of tossing what Kerouac called ''the greatest piece of writing I ever saw'' over the side of a houseboat.
In a 1957 letter to his agent, Kerouac himself makes an attempt to position his foray into dramatic writing: "it is now a real play, an original play, a comedy but with overtones of sadness and with some pretty fine spontaneous speeches that are as good as Odets" (Beat Generation).
Kerouac uses the economy of haiku to conjure an image that evokes a loss of innocence; Corso's speaker in "Dream of a Baseball Star" witnesses the decline of Ted Williams' prowess in the midst of a comical and surreal dream; and finally, the losers in Ferlinghetti's "Baseball Canto" are the stodgy, white traditionalists who find that their old-fashioned American pastime has grown more democratic and multi cultural on the heels of the sport's integration.
Pilgrims contains five close readings, a set of explanatory notes for readers of The Dharma Bums, three book reviews, a substantial essay on the work of Bob Kaufman, three brief cultural studies essays on Kerouac and Corso, as well notes on Ken Nordine and James S.
Based on an untold true story with Kerouac, Burroughs and Carr all becoming murder suspects, debut director John Krokidas unflinchingly shoots even the film's most dramatic moments with an unusually shallow depth of field.