Ketone Bodies


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Ketone Bodies

 

a group of organic compounds (β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetoacetic acid, acetone) that are formed in the liver, accumulated in the blood (ketonemia), and excreted in the urine (ketonuria) when fatty acids are incompletely oxidized because of a metabolic disturbance associated with starvation and certain pathological states, such as diabetes mellitus. Also called acetone bodies.

References in periodicals archive ?
Because of differences in their mitochondrial metabolism, ketone bodies appear to have unique beneficial properties, as compared to either glucose or fatty acids, the other members of the group of three non-nitrogenous substrates for energy production.
Ketone bodies, primarily acetoacetetate and D-beta-hydroxybutyric acid (D(beta)HB), play a very significant role in human metabolism independent of being key intermediates in fat synthesis and breakdown.
Accumulated acetyl-CoA depressed the level of ACAT and decreased the production of ketone bodies.
The ketone bodies themselves (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone) have been shown to have anticonvulsive properties.
However, on day 7, ketone bodies in the PG-treated group were lower than in the control group.
Our bodies will transition to stored fat for energy, which is broken down to ketone bodies which can then be burned by all of the tissues, especially the brain.
While ketone bodies such as beta'OHB can be toxic when present at very high concentrations in people with diseases such as Type I diabetes, Dr.
Contract notice: Directives supply detminaciEn strips for glucose and ketone bodies in blood and deteminaciEn glucose and ketone bodies in urine, using electronic bidding.
These metabolic adaptations that take place in obese people impair the normal release of fatty acids from adipose tissue and restrict the ability to stimulate formation of ketone bodies (a byproduct of the breakdown of fatty acids).
In this state, the body breaks down stored fats incompletely into ketone bodies, which then are released into the circulation.
It has been reported earlier that the capacity for production of ketone bodies in immature infants is low, which would make these infants particularly dependent on glucose for their energy supply to the brain.
Ketone bodies are formed when the body is forced to burn fat for energy.