Khazaria


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Khazaria

 

(1) The region in which the nomadic Khazars wandered. The boundaries of Khazaria were formed by the western coast of the Caspian Sea as far as the Sulak River in northern Dagestan, by the lower Don River to the point at which it comes closest to the Volga, by the lower course of the Volga, and by part of the Northern Caspian Lowland.

(2) The territory controlled by the Khazars. Long after the fall of the Khazar Kaganate in the tenth century the name “Khazaria” continued to be used as a designation for the eastern Crimea.

References in periodicals archive ?
He discusses the ideology of the ninth and tenth centuries: the difficult reconciliation of steppe traditions with Judaic monotheism, the Pechenegs in Khazar history, Khazaria and international trade in eastern Europe, the Khazar economy: economic integration or disintegration, and the "internal" ethnic communities in Khazaria.
Following the latter group's arrival in the peninsula, the area came under the rule of the state of Khazaria until 1083.
The Ashkenazi are Eastern European in origin and descendants of the peoples of the Kingdom of Khazaria.
The recent study by John Hopkins geneticist Dr Elhaik confirmed that the common genome structure of the Ashkenazi (European) Jew gravitated towards an origin in old Khazaria.
He should seek his heart in Eastern Europe and Russia and Khazaria where he and the bulk of these lying Zionists came from to this Arab land as invaders," said Yousuf Al-Khatib, a local Jerusalemite leader.
One of his key sources is the so-called Schechter Letter, excavated in Egypt in the 1880s, which relates the story of a campaign against Khazaria by HLGW (Oleg) around 941, in which Oleg was defeated by the Khazar general Pesakh; see, Constantine Zuckerman, "On the Date of the Khazars' Conversion to Judaism and the Chronology of the Kings of the Rus Oleg and Igor' Revue des etudes Byzantines, Vol.
In this book he presents his findings, looking first at the controversy regarding the Germany hypothesis and the Khazaria hypothesis and then focusing on the development of Ashkenazi Jewry region by region.
Jewish presence is also attested in the mediaeval states of Khazaria (sixth to tenth century) and Kyivan Rus' (ninth to thirteenth century).
He does not really prove that the Ashkenazi Jews are the descendants of the population of the kingdom of Khazaria, who converted to Judaism in the Middle Ages.
Halevi's classic theological defense of Judaism, the Kuzari, is largely structured as a fictional exchange between a rabbi and the mythical gentile King of Khazaria, a nation whose historical embrace of Judaism in the eighth or ninth century remains hopelessly obscure and mired in a continuing argument over Halevi's work.
The Jews of Khazaria is, in essence, a compendium of information gathered from every available source, with the help of an army of scholars with Khazar interests and of translators from German, Swedish, Polish, Russian, Bulgarian, Hungarian, and Hebrew.
When they meet Faliq, a young man who claims to be the rightful heir to the Jewish kingdom of Khazaria, they embark on a whirlwind quest to raise an army, march on the capitol city of Atil, and seize the throne from its evil usurper.