Killer Moth


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Batman #63 © 1951 DC Comics. COVER ART BY BOB KANE, LEW SAYRE SCHWARTZ, AND CHARLES PARIS.

Killer Moth

(pop culture)
No one took Killer Moth seriously—not his archfoes Batman and Robin, not the other supervillains pillaging Gotham City, and not even the readers of DC Comics. Buzzing into Batman #63 (1951), the man behind the moth-shaped mask is racketeer Drury Walker (aka Cameron Van Cleer), who steals a page from Batman's playbook: donning a garish purple, orange, and green costume (with insect wings), crawling the streets in a Mothmobile, and shining a Mothsignal into the skies, he takes the name Killer Moth and hires himself out to protect Gotham's gangsters from apprehension. Batman and Robin, however, squash his caper with little effort. Yet like a pesky gnat, Killer Moth fluttered into comics on numerous occasions, most famously in Detective Comics #359 (1967), in which his attempt to kidnap millionaire Bruce (Batman) Wayne was easily swatted by Barbara Gordon in her first appearance as Batgirl. In Underworld Unleashed #1 (1995), the ridiculed rogue sold his soul to the demon Neron in exchange for a more formidable identity. Killer Moth metamorphosed into Charaxes, a ghastly humanoid insect with an impervious exoskeleton. Feasting on the bodies of humans, he is no longer a joke, and regularly plagues Robin and sometimes even Batman. The Killer Moth gang, inane thugs wearing wobbly antenna caps, appeared in the unaired 1967 pilot that introduced Batgirl to the live-action Batman series (1966–1968), and the singular Killer Moth, voiced by Thomas Hayden Church, is part of the rogues' gallery on the Cartoon Network's Teen Titans (2003–2006).