Kimhi


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Kimhi

(kĭm`hē) or

Kimchi

(kĭm`khē), family of Jewish scholars and grammarians in Spain and France. Joseph ben Isaac Kimhi, c.1105–c.1170, besides writing a Bible commentary, making numerous translations, and writing poems of merit, introduced the long and short divisions of Hebrew vowels (increasing their number from 7 to 10) and elaborated the passive verb forms. He is the author of what may be the first European Jewish anti-Christian polemic, Sefer Ha-Berit. Moses Kimhi, d. c.1190, son of Joseph, wrote The Paths of Knowledge, a grammatical textbook that is a mine of philological information and was heavily used by the 16th cent. Christian Hebraists. David Kimhi, known as Redak, c.1160–c.1235, another son, wrote Mikhlol [completeness], long the leading Hebrew grammar, The Book of Roots, a dictionary of the Bible, and The Pen of the Scribe, a manual of punctuation. Standard editions of the Hebrew Bible frequently included his learned and lucid commentaries; in Latin translation they greatly influenced Christian translators of the Bible.
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69) Ayal Kimhi, "Has Debt Restructuring Facilitated Structural Transformation on Israeli Family Farms?
Omer Kimhi, Chapter 9 of the Bankruptcy Code: A Solution in Search of a Problem, 27 YALE J.
David Kimhi (the Radak) on Genesis 24, "And when these matters are repeated, there occurs variation in wording, but the sense is the same (yesh bahem shinui millot, aval ha-ta'am ehad).
The Aramaic Targum, Ibn Ezra, and David Kimhi all understand the verse in this fashion.
2013; Jones 1994; Yen 2005a), but differ from findings by Kimhi (1999) for Israel and Aristei and Pieroni (2008) for Italy.
Kimhi O, Caspi D, Bornstein NM, Maharshak N, Gur A, Arbel Y, et al.
That's what Israeli author and Meretz party activist Alona Kimhi posted on her Facebook page after being interviewed by the gadfly and journalist-provocateur Tuvia Tenenbom.
Confino-Cohen R, Chodick G, Shalev V, Leshno M, Kimhi O, Goldberg A.
Rabbi David Kimhi (Radak) (1160-1235) lived in Narbonne, Provence.
See Gillette, supra note 22, at 291; Omer Kimhi, Chapter 9 of
Su fragilidad es, justamente, la causa de su fuerza (Varo 2010; Bloom 2011, 2; Gosh 2008; Gonzalez 2008; Hasso 2005, 23-51; Kimhi y Even 2003).