Kirakos Gandzaketsi

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Kirakos Gandzaketsi

 

Born 1200; died 1271. Armenian historian; author of The History of Armenia. The first part of the book covers the period from the beginning of the fourth century through 1197, and the second brings the account to 1265. The second part of the book is the more valuable, since it is based on the verbal evidence of contemporaries and the observations of Kirakos Gandzaketsi himself, who was held prisoner by the Mongols for a long time. The book describes in detail the invasion of Jalal-ad-Din, the ruler of Khwarazm, and particularly the invasion of the Mongol-Tatar hordes. The works of Kirakos Gandzaketsi are a most important source for the history of Mongol rule in Armenia and neighboring countries.

References in periodicals archive ?
Apareceram escritores e historiadores, poetas e retoricos, juristas e filosofos, algumas de suas obras chegaram ate nos tais como os "Canones Augen" do seculoV, as "Lamentacoes Sobre a Morte do Principe Djavanshir de Gardman", do poeta Davdak (seculo VII), a "Historia dos Albaneses", de Moises Outiyski, a "Cronica Albanesa" e o "Codigo das Leis", de Mhitara Gosha (seculo XII), a "Historia", de Kirakos Gandzakski e "Os Canones", de David Gandzaski, que viveram no seculo XIII, assim como os monumentos epigraficos do Azerbaijao e do sul do Daguestao.
In addition, an Armenian activist, Vahan Kirakos, has launched a campaign for the Syrian presidency in an effort to promote equal rights for all Syrian citizens.
The Armenian chronicler Kirakos recorded that once Mongol rule was established,
Kirakos also records in his chronicle the conversion of Persian and Turkish Muslims to Christianity,(73) which under Islamic law (sharia) was a death-penalty offense; under Mongol rule, however, this provision could not be enforced because of the right of any person to choose his or her own faith.
The Armenian historian Kirakos recorded that, in the western regions of the Mongol realm, Sartach (Sartakh), the son of Batu,
Kirakos Gandzaketsi, History of the Armenians, critical edition, ed.
The Mongols probably used the horses they plundered not as mounts, but as rations, such as they offered to their prisoner, Kirakos of Ganja.
2) Arman Kirakos attends a vigil at Cal State Northridge on Tuesday in memory of the Armenians killed during the Ottoman Empire massacre.
A close resemblance was revealed between several of the abbreviated accounts and their counterparts in the synaxary (yaysmawurk') of Kirakos Ganjakec'i completed in 1269.