Kiukiang

Kiukiang:

see JiujiangJiujiang
or Kiukiang,
city (1994 est. pop. 322,300), N Jiangxi prov., China, on the Chang River, near Poyang Lake. A major river port, it is connected by rail with Nanchang. In a major tea-growing area, it is a large processing, marketing, and shipping point.
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, China.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is not until the moment when he is abandoned by Uncle Philip in Kiukiang Road and returns home to find his house empty and his mother missing that he finally comes to a fearful recognition of his identity--an orphan with no parents, no home, and no protection.
hours to protect lives during a disturbance at Kiukiang.
Nationalist forces captured Kiukiang, naval forces were
Hi-Fert Pty Ltd v Kiukiang Maritime Carriers Inc (No 5) (1998) 90 FCR 1 at 14.
6) In Hi-Fert Pty Ltd v Kiukiang Maritime Carriers Inc [No 5], Emmett J, in obiter, considered that international arbitral tribunals do not exercise the judicial power of the Commonwealth because their determinations do not have an enforceable nature equivalent to that of a court order.
147) See Sutcliffe v Thackrah [1974] AC 727, 745 (Lord Morris); PMT Partners Pry Lid (in liq) v Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service (1995) 184 CLR 301, 311-12 (Brennan CJ, Gaudron and McHugh JJ); Hi-Fert Pty Ltd v Kiukiang Maritime Carriers Inc [No 5] (1998) 90 FCR 1, 14 (Emmett J); James Morrison, 'Drawing a Line in the Sand: Defining the Scope of Arbitrable Disputes in Australia' (2005) 22 Journal of International Arbitration 395, 395.
161) See also Hi-Fert Pry Ltd v Kiukiang Maritime Carriers Inc [No 3] (1998) 86 FCR 374, 381, where Beaumont J held that s 7 of the IAA simply creates an entitlement for the parties to have their agreement to arbitrate enforced.
210) Cf Hi-Fert Pry Ltd v Kiukiang Maritime Carriers Inc [No 5] (1998) 90 FCR 1, 14 (Emmett J).
s brick-tea factory which is managed by a Scotchman, who invented and adapted several of the machines and processes employed, is the largest factory in Hankow, employing fourteen hundred workmen through the long season, and shipping nearly a million bricks a year, with an almost equal output from their factory at Kiukiang.
A landing force was sent ashore for a few hours to protect lives during a disturbance at Kiukiang.
Principal battles: Wuchang (Wuhan) (1856); Kiukiang (Jiujiang) (1858).
Born in Hunan province into a moderately prosperous family (1817); joined the Hunan militia, later famous during the Taiping Rebellion as the Hunan Braves (1852); won a reputation for aggressiveness, valor, and resourcefulness; becoming a veteran combat leader, he led the Braves in a successful assault on the Taiping stronghold of Wuchang (December 1856); he frustrated repeated Taiping counterattacks by constructing numerous water-filled trenches as obstacles; continued down the Yangtze valley, clearing the countryside around Kiukiang and then capturing the city itself (May 19, 1858); killed a few months later leading his troops in an assault on the Taiping fortress of Luchou (in Anhui) (November 15).