patella

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patella

(pətĕl`ə): see kneecapkneecap
(patella), saucer-shaped bone at the front of the knee joint; it protects the ends of the femur, or thighbone, and the tibia, the large bone of the foreleg. The kneecap is embedded in the tendon tissue of the quadriceps femoris, a large thigh muscle.
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patella

[pə′tel·ə]
(anatomy)
A sesamoid bone in front of the knee, developed in the tendon of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Also known as kneecap.

patella

1. Anatomy a small flat triangular bone in front of and protecting the knee joint
2. Biology a cuplike structure, such as the spore-producing body of certain ascomycetous fungi
3. Archaeol a small pan
References in periodicals archive ?
Daniel Agger is playing with a minor fracture in his knee cap
We showed that compressive forces behind the knee cap were reduced in the majority of cases and this was independent of running speed.
This could be due to knee cap problem or a ligament injury.
This involves shaving the rough parts off the back of the knee cap, it can be done as a keyhole procedure.
When the point guard had the less serious injury two years ago of a dislocated knee cap, he missed 39 games.
In a total knee replacement, up to three bone surfaces may be replaced--the lower ends of the thigh bone; the top surface of the shin bone; and/or the back surface of the knee cap (Fig.
The worst injuries among those detained in hospital include a broken shin and a fractured knee cap.
The Liverpool midfielder will miss the start of next season after an operation in the United States to repair his knee cap.
Reserve offensive guard Josh Jones, however, may undergo surgery this week for what UO coach Mike Bellotti described as `problems under the knee cap.
Pain in the anterior or front of the knee is a very common condition, which is often due to changes in the mechanics of the joint between the knee cap and the thigh bone, known as the patellofemoral joint.
Specifically, he reported an 81-percent success rate in 31 defects of the femoral condyle, the part of the knee formed by the end of the thigh bone, and an 87-percent success rate in 15 defects of the knee cap.
I was an 85-year-old lady, unwell and unable to walk far, needing a new knee cap and not feeling very confident of success - but I had no need to worry.