Kodiak Island


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Kodiak Island

(kō`dēăk'), 5,363 sq mi (13,890 sq km), c.100 mi (160 km) long and 10–60 mi (16–96 km) wide, off S Alaska, separated from the Alaska PeninsulaAlaska Peninsula,
SW Alaska, extending 500 mi (800 km) SW from the mainland, separating Bristol Bay and the Bering Sea from Cook Inlet, the Shelikof Strait, and Pacific Ocean.
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 by Shelikof Strait. Alaska's largest island, Kodiak is mountainous and heavily forested in the north and east; the native grasses in the south offer good pasturage for cattle and sheep. The island has many ice-free, deeply penetrating bays that provide sheltered anchorages and transportation routes. The Kodiak bear and the Kodiak king crab are native to the island. Most of the island is a national wildlife refuge. In 1912 the eruption of Mt. Katmai on the mainland blanketed the island with volcanic ash, causing widespread destruction and loss of life (see Katmai National Park and PreserveKatmai National Park and Preserve
, at the northern end of the Alaska Peninsula on Shelikof Strait, S Alaska, comprising Katmai National Park (3,674,530 acres/1,487,664 hectares) and an adjoining preserve (418,699 acres/169,514 hectares).
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). Explored in 1763 by Russian fur trader Stepan Glotov, the island was the scene of the first permanent Russian settlement in Alaska, founded by Grigori Shelekhov, a fur trader, on Three Saints Bay in 1784. The settlement was moved to Kodiak village in 1792 and became the center of Russian fur trading. The largest town on the island is Kodiak (1990 pop. 6,365). Salmon fishing is a major occupation; the Karluk River is famous for its salmon run. Livestock farms, numerous canneries, and some copper mining are also prevalent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: The mountain goat country on Alaska's Kodiak Island can be an unforgiving place for a bowhunter, particularly in November when winter storms begin to batter the high country.
sitkensis) is generally smaller in the body on the mainland and the Queen Charlotte Islands but actually developed larger body size after being introduced onto Kodiak Island back in the 1920s.
I'm thinking I may include a pair of low-cut black Converse tennis shoes in the gear I take to Kodiak Island.
Key words: Alaska, habitat use, Kodiak Island, migration, Polysticta stelleri, Russia, satellite telemetry, sea duck, Steller's Eider, waterfowl
The operation is under the direction of a unified command structure made up of Shell, the Coast Guard, the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation and the Kodiak Island Borough.
Miller learned in her research that counter to what happened at other colonial outposts, Kreol children on Kodiak Island were singled out for specialized training in preparation for their service in the fur trade and the church.
Kodiak Island is known as "Alaska's Emerald Isle" as it offers stunning scenery and an abundance of wildlife - perfect for lovers of the great outdoors.
The company provides trash, recycling and composting services in Anchorage, the Matanuska-Susitna Valley, Fairbanks, the Kenai Peninsula and Kodiak Island, Waste Connections said when the deal was first announced last August.
11 In which series did cameraman Richard Terry travel to Kodiak Island in Alaska to document the life and work of Swiss biologist David Bittner?
And here cameraman Richard Terry travelled to the remote Alaskan wilderness of Kodiak Island (and where better place to take a camera) to document the work of intrepid Swiss biologist David Bittner, who chose to spend seven years living a solitary and dangerous existence among its deadly bears.