Qift

(redirected from Koptos)

Qift:

see CoptosCoptos
or Coptus
, ancient city of Egypt, on the right bank of the Nile, c.27 mi (43 km) N of modern Luxor. Remains of the Temple of Min, patron god of Coptos, have been found there as well as relics from the time of Ramses II and Thutmose III.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, like Hurston's, Reed's Moses travels up the Nile to Koptos to battle a "deathless snake" (178) guarding the Book of Thoth, the ultimate source of Moses's power, confirming both authors' interest in extracanonical versions of the Exodus legend.
A pair of hand-printed Shantung silk banners permanently installed in the museum's Egyptian Galleries, Spero's Koptos Gateway Banners (2003; Fig.
This article traces the origin of recurring goddess images in the artist's trans-historical iconography, her "cast of characters," which reappear in her Koptos Gateway Banners as gestural and figural mutations interacting within the museum's framework.
Nut became a powerful figure for Spero, and she is depicted repeatedly on the Koptos Gateway Banners, as Isis's mother, creator of the world and mother of all gods, protector of the dead, and vehicle of resurrection.
17) Thus, the Koptos Gateway Banners are part of a continuum of re-presentation within Spero's oeuvre, an epic-scale refiguring of symbolic fragments stretching back to prehistoric and classical eras, emblematic of past myths and ceremonies but reconfigured within contemporary feminist perspectives.
In the Koptos Gateway Banners, Spero presents an updated origination myth celebrating the great goddess Isis by interweaving ancient and contemporary images, styles, and compositional strategies.
Another goal of the artist is to recreate a sense of the drama and mystery of ancient rites performed within the Koptos Gateway.
The original cult scenes on the Koptos Gateway depict the goddess Isis entering and inhabiting the temple dedicated to her: "Lady of Upper and Lower Egypt.
The cry of it is that it is in the middle of the river at Koptos, in an iron box; in the iron box is a bronze box; in the bronze box is a sycamore box; in the sycamore box is an ivory and ebony box and in the ebony box is a silver box; in the silver box is a golden box and in that is the book.
1970; De Koptos a Kosseir, 1972; Le Panenion d'El-Kanais: les inscription grecques, 1972; Les Portes du desert (Recueil des inscriptions grecques d' Antinoupolis, Tentyris, Koptos, Apollonopolis Parva, Apollonopolis Magna), 1984; Sorciers grecques, 1991; La prose sur pierre dans l'Egipte hellenistique et romaine, 2 vols.
Harold Bayley writes: "In Egypt Pan was known as Min, and three gigantic limestone figures of Min have been found at the town of Koptos, the chief seat of his worship.
Upon visiting the temple of Osiris and Isis in Koptos, Moses actually does gain access to the Text, or a version of it, and leaves feeling that he has "gotten it all down.