Kublai Khan


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Kublai Khan

(ko͞o`blī kän), 1215–94, Mongol emperor, founder of the Yüan dynasty of China. From 1251 to 1259 he led military campaigns in S China. He succeeded (1260) his brother Mongke (Mangu) as khan of the empire that their grandfather Jenghiz KhanJenghiz Khan
or Genghis Khan
, Mongolian Chinggis Khaan, 1167?–1227, Mongol conqueror, originally named Temujin. He succeeded his father, Yekusai, as chieftain of a Mongol tribe and then fought to become ruler of a Mongol confederacy.
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 had founded. The empire reached its greatest territorial extent with Kublai's final defeat (1279) of the Sung dynasty of China; however, his campaigns against Japan (see kamikazekamikaze
[Jap.,=divine wind], the typhoon that destroyed Kublai Khan's fleet, foiling his invasion of Japan in 1281. In World War II the term was used for a Japanese suicide air force composed of fliers who crashed their bomb-laden planes into their targets, usually ships.
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), Myanmar, Vietnam, and Indonesia failed. Kublai's rule as the overlord of the Mongol empire was nominal except in Mongolia and China. He recruited men of all nations for his civil service, but only Mongols were permitted to hold the highest government posts. He promoted economic prosperity by rebuilding the Grand Canal, repairing public granaries, and extending highways. He fostered Chinese scholarship and arts. Although he favored Tibetan Buddhism (Lamaism), other religions (except Taoism) were tolerated. Kublai encouraged foreign commerce, and his magnificent capital at Cambuluc (now Beijing) was visited by several Europeans, notably Marco Polo, who described it. It was long thought to be the city Xanadu, featured in Coleridge's poem Kubla Khan. Kublai's name is also spelled Khubilai, Kubilai, Koublai, and Kubla.

Bibliography

See J. J. Saunders, The History of the Mongol Conquests (1971); M. Rossabi, Khubilai Khan (1988).

Kublai Khan

 

(Mongol posthumous title, Setsen Khan; Chinese temple name, Shih-tsu). Born Sept. 23, 1215; died Feb. 18, 1294, in what is now Peking. Fifth Mongol great khan (from 1260); grandson of Genghis Khan.

During the reign of the Mongol khan Mangu (1251–59), Kublai was made head of an army sent to complete the conquest of China. After Mangu’s death, he seized the throne. In 1260 he moved the capital from Karakorum to the city of K’aip’ing in China, and in 1264 he made Chungtu (now Peking) the capital. On Dec. 18, 1271, Kublai Khan gave his Mongol Dynasty the Chinese name Ta Yuan. In 1279 he completed the conquest of the empire of the Southern Sung, thereby extending his rule to all of China. Kublai Khan’s military expeditions to Japan in 1274 and 1281 and to Java in 1293 were unsuccessful, as were the campaigns of Mongol forces to Vietnam between 1257 and 1288 and to Burma between 1277 and 1287.

Kublai Khan

?1216--94, Mongol emperor of China: grandson of Genghis Khan. He completed his grandfather's conquest of China by overthrowing the Sung dynasty (1279) and founded the Yuan dynasty (1279--1368)
References in periodicals archive ?
Named after the Mongolian emperor of China in the Middle Ages, the Kublai Khan has a distinctively oriental flavour.
In the 1960s when I first read about the Venetian merchant and emissary of Kublai Khan in middle school and watched the colorful European-produced film adaptation of his life downtown, I questioned neither the story details, the particulars of its original composition, nor the liberal translation of the textbook story to film.
to Genghis Khan and Kublai Khan, who swept out of the barren steppes to the east of the Caspian Sea to carve a bloody swathe from eastern Anatolia to northern India.
Curiously, the figure who makes the greatest impression in Bergreen's biography isn't Marco Polo but his patron, Kublai Khan.
First of a two-part drama retelling of the life of 13th-century Venetian trader Marco Polo and his epic journey to the Far East with Mongol ruler Kublai Khan.
That said, Hwang also points to the upcoming "Marco Polo" TV miniseries with Brian Dennehy as Kublai Khan.
This adventure begins with a trip into the past of Genghis and Kublai Khan and an accidental ancient ocean voyage to Hawaii.
In this extraordinary work, Kublai Khan, emperor of all the East, employs Marco Polo to tell him about the cities of his realm.
Even without driving through the diplomatic areas, one is aware of being in a capital, and an ancient one at that, dating to Kublai Khan in the 13th century.
In 1274, a typhoon prevented the invasion and probable conquest of Japan by the Mongol king Kublai Khan.
The film will follow the explorer's 24-year trek into Asia and his meetings with Kublai Khan, who was once the richest man on earth.
Indeed, all of Calvino's narratives can be described as a form of map-making: while in the novel discussed in this article, Le citta inivisibili, the epistemological connotations of cartography are explicitly debated by the emperor Kublai Khan and the explorer Marco Polo, even his other fictions are forms of map-making.