Kumasi

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Kumasi

(ko͞omă`sē, –mä`–), city (1984 pop. 376,246), capital of the Ashanti Region, central Ghana. The second largest city in Ghana, it is a commercial and transportation center in a cocoa-producing region, and it has a large central market. Kumasi was founded c.1700 as the capital of the Ashanti confederacy. Although the British destroyed the Ashanti palace in 1874, the city remains the seat of Ashanti kings. A university of science and technology and other schools are in the city.

Kumasi

 

a city in Ghana; administrative center of the Ashanti Region. Population, 343,000 (1970). Kumasi is a junction of railroads (connecting it with Accra and Takoradi) and high-ways. It is the commercial center of an agricultural (producing mainly cocoa) and lumbering region. The city’s industry is represented by sawmilling, woodworking, cocoa processing, fish refrigeration, and the production of building materials. There is also a footwear factory. From the late 17th to 19th century, Kumasi was the residence of the supreme chief of the Ashanti state.

Kumasi

a city in S Ghana: seat of Ashanti kings since 1663; university (1961); market town for a cocoa-producing region. Pop.: 862 000 (2005 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the early 1810s, the Kumase Bosommuruhene arrived in Asienkyemu.
From the 1760s, Asante was increasingly frustrated by Fante involvement in and influence over the gun-slave cycle crucial to the Kumase government (see, most recently, Shumway 2011).
For example, the Kumase Anantahene was present when 'the king won the appellation Bonsu by placing the sword into the sea for the first time in the annals of Asante history'.
That meant that the 'frontier' of Asante in any direction from Kumase lay at a distance of twenty-one days' walk (adaduonu) (Wilks 1992; McCaskie 1980).
It is tempting to think that he planned its symbolic subjugation in Kumase prior to his invasion of Fante.
Belatedly, the railwaymen in charge conceded that many of the accidents could have been prevented had construction crews and the colonial government slowed down their pell-mell rush to the major gold-mining centre at Obuasi and thence to Kumase, capital of the great Asante kingdom, and had the original construction staff been kept on for an extra year to iron out kinks and flaws.
To make matters worse, the shadowy powers of the London-based consulting engineers intruded into the operational phase long after the Kumase line was completed.
It was a wonderful sight to behold thousands of Asantes, mostly clad in beautiful kente (hand-woven silk cloths) filling the Kumase Sports Stadium to greet their King.
They didn't go to the Kumase Stadium to give money to their King.
In that year, the British were able to invade the Asante capital, Kumase, and lay waste to it.
Having "emasculated" Asante (as they thought), the British then sent a governor, Sir Frederick Hodgson, to Kumase to put a political seal on Asante's military "capitulation".
So Nana Yaa Asantewaa led an army to besiege the British in the fort of Kumase.