Kumgan

Kumgan

 

a metal or ceramic vessel for water. Metal kumgany have been known in the countries of the East since antiquity. They usually are narrow-necked jugs, with a long spout, a handle, and a lid. Metal kumgany are decorated with embossing, engraving, and inlay. In Russia, ceramic kumgany became wide-spread between the early 17th and 19th centuries. They are similar in shape to kvasniki but do not have a hole piercing the center of the disklike body. The ceramic kumgany, which were polished and glazed (for example, covered with a green glaze), were decorated with reliefs; the majolica and faience kumgany were embellished with polychromatic painting.

References in periodicals archive ?
45) A kumgan is a pitcher for carrying and pouring water with which to clean oneself after using the toilet.
Shoes and kumgans of all shapes and sizes lay about.
And this was only made worse by the now year-long suspension of activities in the Mount Kumgan resort complex on the North's East coast, run by Hyundai, which formerly had close to a million visitors a year (the suspension was caused by the death of a South Korean tourist, who was shot while in a restricted area in the early hours of one morning in summer 2008).